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Ton Hoenselaars
English Department, Utrecht University
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SHAKESPEARE IN EUROPEAN CULTURE
A BIBLIOGRAPHY

Editors: Ton Hoenselaars and Dirk Delabastita


The items in this bibliography have been annotated by members of the European Shakespeare Research Association. Contributors may be identified by means of the initials in square brackets at the end of the annotation. Where we have used the author’s own abstract, this is acknowledged as such.

All users are kindly invited to contribute further entries or abstracts. These can be sent to the two editors at the following addresses: dirk.delabastita@fundp.ac.be or A.J.Hoenselaars@uu.nl. Please refer to the Guidelines.


List of contributors

BSA: Bartolomé Sanz Albiñana (Universidad de Alicante, Spain)

DD: Dirk Delabastita (University of Namur, Belgium)

FL: François Laroque (University of Paris III, France)

IM: Irena Makaryk (University of Toronto, Canada)

TH: Ton Hoenselaars (Utrecht University, the Netherlands)

MY: Mara Yanni (University of Athens, Greece)

MEM: Maria Elisa Montironi (University of Urbino “Carlo Bo”, Italy)

MW: Michèle Willems (Emer. University of Rouen, France)

WW: Wolfgang Weiss (Emer. University of Munich, Germany)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A


Aaltonen, Sirkku, “La Perruque in a Rented Apartment: Rewriting Shakespeare in Finland” in Ilha do desterro: A Journal of English Language, Literatures in English, and Cultural Studies (Brazil), 36 (1999): 141-159

*

Abend-David, Dror, “Scorned My Nation”. A Comparison of Translations of The Merchant of Venice into German, Hebrew, and Yiddish. Comparative Cultures and Literatures 16 (New York, etc.: Peter Lang, 2003)

This book looks at Jewish responses to the Merchant, revealing a dazzling range of interpretations, assessments and appropriations as they manifest themselves through a large selection of translations and adaptations. The author tries to understand the human choices and the social, political and even certain economic factors which have shaped the changing perceptions of Shylock and Jewish self-perceptions across the centuries and in a wide range of situations (Diaspora life, secularization, victimization, Zionism, Palestine, Israel, Jewish-American communities, Ultra-Orthodoxy...). [DD]

*

Afonso, M.J. da Rocha, “Simão de Melo Brandão and the First Portuguese Version of Othello” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 129-146 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

This paper sketches the situation of the theatre in Portugal in the eighteenth century. Portugal was not yet ready for an enthusiastic reception of Shakespeare, but his name was occasionally mentioned in publications. The paper centres on Othello, ou o Mouro de Veneza, considered to be the first translation of a Shakespearean play in Portugal. It remained unpublished; the undated manuscript is probably from the late eighteenth century, and its author seems to have been a priest called Simão de Melo Brandão. His version was based on La Place’s free French translation and it introduced several further changes, partly to bring the play into line with the conventions of the drama of the Arcádia group. [DD]

*

Agarez Medeiros, Helena, French Taste versus English Taste: Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Voltaire’s La Mort de César and Aaron Hill’s The Roman Revenge (PhD thesis, KU Leuven, 2008)

This study sheds new light on the well-known antagonism between Voltaire and Shakespeare by creating a double focus on Shakespeare’s most famous Roman tragedy. The first two chapters examine French perceptions of ‘English taste’ from the late seventeenth century onwards and French translation theories and practices in the eighteenth century, including Voltaire’s rendering of Hamlet. Chapter three gives a detailed analysis of La Mort de César, Voltaire’s rewriting – allegedly “entirely in the English taste” – of Julius Caesar. Chapter four examines the polemical way in which Aaron Hill re-adapts and reclaims La Mort de César for the English audience, showing his disagreement with French perceptions of English taste. [DD]

*

Alekseev, M.P., Sekspir i russkaja kul’tura (Moscow: Akademija nauk SSSR, 1965)

*

Alexander, Edward, “Shakespeare’s Plays in Armenia” in Shakespeare Quarterly 9 (1958): 387-394

*

Alexandre-Bergues, P., “Shakespeare: lectures et traductions fin de siecle” in Alfa 10/11 (1997/1998): 267-280

*

Allison, Jonathan, “W. B. Yeats and Shakespearean Character” in Shakespeare and Ireland: History, Politics, Culture. Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray, 114-135 (Houndmills: Macmillan, 1997)

*

Alves, Junia and Marcia Noe, “Life is an Inverted Circus: Grupo Galpao’s Romeu e Julieta adapted from Pennafort’s translation of Shakespeare’s” in Ilha do Desterro 36 (January/June 1999): 265-281

*

Ampère, Jean-Jacques, “Le théâtre comparé de Racine et de Shakespeare” in Le Globe (1825)

*

Andreyeva, Vera, Shakespeare in Estonia (Moscow, n.p., 1979)

*

Anzi, Anna, Shakespeare nei teatri milanesi del Novecento. Biblioteca di studi inglesi 70 (Bari: Adriatica, 1980)

*

Aradas, Isabella, “Macbeth” in Italia. Biblioteca di studi inglesi 49 (Bari: Adriatica, 1989)

*

Arnold, Thomas James I., Shakespeare, in de Nederlandsche letterkunde en op het Nederlandsch tooneel. Bibliografisch overzicht (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1879)


B

Bachrach, A.G.H., J. Swart and F.W.S. van Tienen, Rondom Shakespeare (Zeist: Uitgevers­maatschappij W. de Haan, 1964)

*

Bailey, Helen Phelps, Hamlet in France from Voltaire to Laforgue (Genève: Librairie Droz, 1964)

A very well documented study of the fortunes of Hamlet in France, from the play’s “mutilated introduction” to its “acceptance as a universal symbol of the dilemma of the man of letters and the artist in an age of action”. Translations and adaptations are discussed, but the emphasis throughout is on criticism and especially on how French commentators from the Age of Enlightenment until Jules Laforgue in the late nineteenth century understood Hamlet’s character and problem. [DD]

*

Baker, Mona (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies (London and New York: Routledge, 1997. Second edition 2009, co-edited by Mona Baker and Gabriela Saldanha)

Part I of this reference work explains the central issues of the discipline of Translation Studies and presents its various ‘schools’ and ‘approaches’. One entry is devoted to the translation of Shakespeare. Part II covers the history of translation in major linguistic and cultural communities across the globe. The surveys of the various traditions (African, American, Arabic, Brazilian and so on) are unavoidably concise but provide essential contextual support to the study of Shakespearean translations worldwide. [DD]

*

Baldensperger, Fernand, “Esquisse d’une histoire de Shakespeare en France” in Études d’histoire littéraire, 155-216 (Paris: Hachette, 1910. Rpt. Genève: Slatkine, 1973)

Trying to supersede the earlier efforts undertaken along the same lines by Albert Lacroix and J.J. Jusserand, the author attempts to provide a balanced survey of Shakespeare’s reception in France, beginning with the famous comment scribbled by Nicolas Clément, royal librarian of the Roi Soleil, and going as far as the beginning of the twentieth century. According to the author the process resulted in the integration of Shakespeare into France’s cultural patrimony. [DD]

*

Bandín, Elena, “Translating at the Service of the Francoist Ideology: Shakespearean Theatre for the Spanish National Theatre (1941-1952). A Study of Paratexts” in New Trends in Translation and Cultural Identity. Edited by Micaela Muñoz-Calvo, Carmina Buesa Gómez and María Ángeles Ruiz Moneva, 117-128 (Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008)

*

“Bardolatry Abroad” in Times Literary Supplement, 13 April 1946: 175

*

Barker, Francis, “Nationalism, Nomadism and Belonging in Europe: Coriolanus” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 233-265 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

*

Barker, Simon, “Re-loading the Canon: Shakespeare and the Study Guides” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 42-57 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

*

Barrault, Jean-Louis, “Shakespeare et nous” in Revue d’histoire littéraire de la France 2 (1950): 131-136

*

Bartmann, Hermann, Grabbes Verhältnis zu Shakespeare (Münster: Johannes Bredt, 1898)

*

Bate, Jonathan, Shakespeare and the English Romantic Imagination (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986)

The book studies Shakespeare’s influence on the creative practices of England’s major romantic poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats and Byron. While addressing general issues – such as the nature of poetic influence and the so-called romantic imagination – its focus is on specific texts and creative effects. There are several references to the wider European context of English romanticism. [DD]

*

Bate, Jonathan, Shakespearean Constitutions: Politics, Theatre, Criticism, 1730-1830 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989)

*

Bate, Jonathan, “The Politics of Romantic Shakespeare Criticism: Germany, England, France” in European Romantic Review 1:1 (1990): 1-26

*

Bate, Jonathan (ed.), The Romantics on Shakespeare (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1992)

*

Bate, Jonathan and Russell Jackson (eds), Shakespeare: An Illustrated Stage History (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996)

*

Bauer, Roger, Michael de Graat and Jürgen Wertheimer (eds), Das Shakespeare-Bild in Europa zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik (Bern: Peter Lang, 1988)

A well documented volume on Shakespeare’s reception in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe. Translations are examined along with other forms of rewriting such as stage adaptations, criticism and imitations. [DD]

*

Begemann, Nienke, “De Engelse komedianten in de Nederlanden” in De Gids 127:5 (1965): 398-412

An account of the visits of the Low Countries by the strolling players. The author considers evidence from both English and Dutch sources. [DD]

*

Benedix, Roderich, Die Shakespeareomanie. Zur Abwehr (Stuttgart: Cotta, 1873)

*

Benchetritt, Paul, “Hamlet at the Comédie Française: 1769-1896” in Shakespeare Survey 9 (1956): 59-68

*

Bennett, Karen, “Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet and Socialist Realism: a Case Study in Intersemiotic Translation” in Shakespeare and European Politics. With a foreword by Ton Hoenselaars. Edited by Dirk Delabastita, Jozef De Vos and Paul Franssen, 318-328 (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2008)

*

This essay considers Prokofiev’s ballet music Romeo and Juliet as a case of intersemiotic translation, which renders Shakespeare’s play into music without words – into a musical script that can lend itself to further translation into movement and spectacle. The author links the musical score to Shakespeare’s original play, but also to the politically sensitive context in which it had to function. Artists in the Soviet Union had to conform rigorously to the strictures of socialist realism. Prokofiev’s musical score had a long and problematic production history, which was partly due to the tense political context. In its afterlife, it was claimed by both defenders and opponents of the Soviet regime, a situation which seems to underline the work’s ideological ambiguities and its composer’s hesitations. [DD]

*

Bernofsky, Susan, “Schleiermacher’s Translation Theory and Varieties of Foreignization: August Wilhelm Schlegel vs. Johann Heinrich Voss” in The Translator 3:2 (1997): 175-192

This article compares the work of August Wilhelm Schlegel, arguably the foremost romantic translator (though his work is not overly foreignizing) with that of Johann Heinrich Voss, one of the period’s most heavily foreignizing translators and avowed enemy of all things romantic. The goal is to arrive at a fuller picture of the role played by foreignization in German romantic translation, both in theory and practice. [based on the author’s abstract]

*

Besterman, Theodore (ed.), Voltaire on Shakespeare. Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 54 (Genève: Institut et Musée Voltaire / les Délices, 1967)

An anthology which brings together all Voltaire’s writings on Shakespeare – other than passing references – making it an essential reference for anyone interested in what the editor calls “the encounter between these two forces of nature”. The thirty-eight selections are arranged chronologically, covering a time span of more than half a century from 1726 (a private letter to Nicolas Claude Thieriot) to 1777 (“Lettre à l’Académie française”). The extracts are presented in the language in which they were first written or published (mostly French, occasionally English), but the editor’s annotations are in English, as is his solid introduction. [DD]

*

Beza, Marcu, Shakespeare in Roumania (London: J. M. Dent, 1931)

*

Biet, Christian, “Le Théâtre Anglois d’Antoine de La Place (1746-1749), ou la difficile émergence du théâtre de Shakespeare en France” in Shakespeare et la France. Société française Shakespeare. Actes du Congrès de 2000. Edited by Patricia Dorval, 29-50 (Paris: Société Française Shakespeare / École Normale Supérieure, 2000)

*

Bircher, Martin and Heinrich Straumann, Shakespeare und die deutsche Schweiz bis zum Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts: Eine Bibliographie raisonnée (Bern and Munich: Francke Verlag, 1971)

*

Blinn, Hansjürgen (ed.), Shakespeare-Rezeption: Die Diskussion um Shakespeare in Deutschland. 2 vols (Berlin: Schmidt, 1982, 1988)

The first volume (Ausgewählte Texte von 1741 bis 1788), published in 1982, has a lengthy introduction presenting the contributions of C.W. von Borck, Gottsched, J.E. Schlegel, Nicolai, Wieland, Lessing, Gerstenberg, Herder, Goethe, Lenz, G.A. Bürger and many more to the German Shakespeare culture before presenting a selection of their writings on Shakespeare. The second volume (Ausgewählte Texte von 1793 bis 1827), published six years later, has the same format; it features contributions by Schiller, Friedrich Schlegel, A.W. Schlegel, Tieck, Goethe, Grabbe and others. [DD]

*

Blinn, Hansjürgen, Der deutsche Shakespeare: Eine annotierte Bibliographie zur Shakespeare-Rezeption des deutschsprachigen Kulturraums (Literatur, Theater, Film, Funk, Fernsehen, Musik und bildende Kunst/The German Shakespeare: An Annotated Bibliography of the Shakespeare Reception in German-speaking Countries (Literature, Theatre, Mass Media, Music, Fine Arts) (Berlin: Erich Schmidt, 1993)

A partly annotated bibliography of Shakespeare’s reception in German-speaking countries, listing both primary materials and scholarly publications on the Bard’s presence in translation, literature, the theatre, the mass media, music and the fine arts. [DD]

*

Blinn, Hansjürgen and Wolf Gerhard Schmidt, Shakespeare – deutsch: Bibliographie der Übersetzungen und Bearbeitungen ; zugleich Bestandsnachweis der Shakespeare-Übersetzungen der Herzogin-Anna-Amalia-Bibliothek Weimar (Berlin: Erich Schmidt, 2003)

*

Blum, Eugène, “Shakespeare in the USSR” in Shakespeare Association Bulletin 20 (1945): 99-102

*

Blumenfeld, Odette-Irene, “Shakespeare in Post-Revolutionary Romania: The Great Directors Are Back Home” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 231-246 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Böhtlingk, Arthur, Bismarck und Shakespeare (Stuttgart: Cotta, 1908)

*

Bolin, Wilhelm, “Zur Shakespeare-Literatur Schwedens” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 15 (1880): 73-128

*

Bonnard, George A., “Suggestions towards an Edition of Shakespeare for French, German and Other Continental Readers” in Shakespeare Survey 5 (1952): 10-15

*

Bonnefoy, Yves, Shakespeare and the French poet. Edited by John Naughton (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004)

A meditation on the major plays of Shakespeare and the thorny art of literary translation, Shakespeare and the French Poet contains twelve essays from France’s most esteemed critic and preeminent living poet, Yves Bonnefoy. Bonnefoy offers observations on Shakespeare’s response to the spiritual crisis of his era as well as insights on the practical and theoretical challenges of verse in translation. The book also features a new interview with Bonnefoy. [based on publisher’s information]

*

Borgmeier, Raimund, Shakespeares Sonett When forty winters ... und die deutschen Übersetzer: Untersuchungen zu den Problemen der Shakespeare-Übertragung (München: Wilhelm Fink, 1970)

*

Borgmeier’s study of the German translations of Shakespeare’s Sonnets focuses on sonnet 2. It is indebted to the then fashionable methods of text-internal formal analysis and close reading. This may limit the usefulness of the work today, but many readers will still find it helpful and attractive. [DD]

*

Borrowers and Lenders. The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation (http://www.borrowers.uga.edu) (2005-)

This peer-reviewed, online, multimedia Shakespeare journal publishes scholarship engaging with the many afterlives of Shakespearean texts and their literary, filmic, multimedia and critical histories. The journal alternates ‘general’ issues with themed ones. The European reception of Shakespeare is obviously part of the journal’s remit. [DD]

*

Bottoms, Janet, “Speech, Image, Action: Animating Tales from Shakespeare” in Children’s Literature in Education 32:1 (2001): 3-15

Two assumptions are challenged in this article: that children are naturally disposed toward the animated cartoon, and that translating Shakespeare’s plays into this medium automatically simplifies and gives them child appeal. It examines the confusions and cross-purposes that surrounded the making of the Animated Tales videos, and argues that there are dangers in their uncritical use in schools. It concludes with suggestions as to how they may, nevertheless, be effectively employed with children of all ages. [based on author’s abstract]

*

Braekman, Willy L. P., “Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus. Its relationship to the German Play of 1620 and to Jan Vos’s Aran and Titus” in Studia Germanica Gandensia 9 (1967): 9-117 and 10 (1968): 7-65 (Rpt. Ghent: Seminar of English and American Literature of the University of Ghent, 1969)

*

Bragaglia, Leonardo, Shakespeare in Italia. Personaggi ed interpreti. Vita scenica del teatro di Guglielmo Shakespeare in Italia, 1792-1973 (Rome: Trevi editore, 1973)

*

Brandl, Alois, Shakespeare and Germany. British Academy Lecture (New York: Oxford University Press, 1913)

*

Brennecke, Ernest (ed.), Shakespeare in Germany, 1590-1700. With translations of five early plays, by Ernest Brennecke in collaboration with Henry Brennecke (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964)

*

Brisset, Annie, A Sociocritique of Translation: Theatre and Alterity in Quebec, 1968-1988. Trans. Rosalind Gill and Roger Gannon (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996)

English translation of the author’s acclaimed Sociocritique de la traduction (1990). Brisset investigates French-Canadian translations made for the Quebec theatre between 1968 and 1988, during a period characterized by growing nationalist sentiment and by the search for a specific québécois language. She shows how translations of Shakespeare (as well as of Molière, Anton Chekhov and Bertolt Brecht) were used to furnish the Quebec theatre with materials to build a national tradition. [DD]

*

Bristol, Frank Milton, Shakespeare and America (Chicago: W. C. Hollister & Brothers, 1898. Rpt. New York: AMS Press, 1971)

*

Brix, Michel, “Le Hamlet de Dumas et Meurice, ou les limites de la fidélité romantique” in Alfa 10/11 (1997/1998): 163-172

*

Brosche, Günter, Shakespeare in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek: Ein Postskriptum zum Shakespearejahr (Vienna: St. Gabriel, 1965)

*

Brown, Ivor, “Shakespeare og Danmark” in Berlingske tidende (Copenhagen), 21 May 1957

*

Brown, John Russell, “Foreign Shakespeare and English-speaking Audiences” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 21-35 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

Brown, John Russell, New Sites for Shakespeare: Theatre, the Audience and Asia (London and New York: Routledge, 1999)

A personal testimony as much as an exercise in comparative drama, this book reports on theatre productions and performance styles observed in India and the Far East, presenting them as a challenge to the established Western ways of staging and reading Shakespeare’s plays. [DD]

*

Brown, Richard, “‘Shakespeare Explained’: James Joyce’s Shakespeare from Victorian Burlesque to Postmodern Bard” in Shakespeare and Ireland: History, Politics, Culture. Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray, 91-113 (Houndmills: Macmillan, 1997)

*

Brunkhorst, Martin, Shakespeares Coriolanus in deutscher Bearbeitung. (Berlin, etc.: Walter de Gruyter, 1973)

After an interesting chapter on the European myth of Coriolanus, on its first dramatic versions and on its reception in Germany, the German reception of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus, from the 18th to the 20th century, is discussed by means of seven adaptations of the play, chronologically presented. First of all, the “improved” versions by Lenz, Dyk and Schink are analyzed. Secondly, the “new creations” by Falk and Marbach are discussed. Finally, the last chapter deals with the “experimental” works of Brecht and Grass. Through this study, Martin Brunkhorst shows the interplay between “Shakespeare-Rezeption und Shakespeare-Adaption” (p. vii), between the reception and the adaptation of Shakespeare’s works. [MEM]

*

Bryner, Cyril, “Shakespeare among the Slavs” in Journal of English Literary History 8 (1941): 107-118

*

Buffery, Helena, “El parany del ratolí: the translation of Shakespeare into Catalan” in Journal of Catalan Studies (1997): http://www.uoc.es/jocs/1/translation/translation.html

*

Buffery, Helena, Shakespeare in Catalan: Translating Imperialism (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2007)

A history of Shakespeare’s translation and reception in Catalonia. The book highlights his importance for Catalan cultural revival since the nineteenth century and his contribution to the vitality of contemporary Catalan culture. Many responses to his work are discussed (translations, performances, original works inspired by Shakespeare’s life and works…) and interpreted in terms of cultural politics. [DD]

*

Buffery, Helena, “Tròpics de Shakespeare: Orígens i originalitat del Hamlet català in 1611. Revista de Historia de la traducción 3 (2009): http://www.traduccionliteraria.org/1611/art/buffery.htm

Hamlet is one of the plays which have most captured the imagination of Catalan writers, actors, directors and playwrights. As in many other European cultures, it might be argued that it is the play that determines all subsequent translation and reception of Shakespeare. This article presents a rhetorical history of Hamlet in Catalan, as traced through translations, adaptations and other rewritings of the play, as well as stagings and performances since the second half of the nineteenth century. It explores the play’s status as one of the key generators of discourse about Shakespeare in Catalonia, and analyses the ways in which it interacts with other cultural discourses, on language, theatre and the politics of representation in Catalonia. [based on author’s abstract]

*

Busi, Anna, Otello in Italia, 1777-1972 (Bari: Adriatica, 1973)

*

Bull, Francis, “The Influence of Shakespeare on Wergeland, Ibsen and Bjørnson” in The Norseman 15 (1957): 88-95

*

Burian, Jarka, “Hamlet in Postwar Czech Theatre” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 195-210 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

Burnett, Mark Thornton and Ramona Wray (eds), Shakespeare and Ireland: History, Politics, Culture (Houndmills: Macmillan, 1997)

*

Burt, Richard, “Baroque Down: The Trauma of Censorship in Psychoanalysis and Queer Film Re-visions of Shakespeare and Marlowe” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 328-350 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Burt, Richard (ed.), Shakespeares After Shakespeare. An Encyclopedia of the Bard in Mass Media and Popular Culture. 2 vols (Westport, CT, and London: Greenwood Press, 2007)

An impressive survey of Shakespeare’s many afterlives in the media and in popular culture. There are survey chapters followed by play-by-play entries for the following domains: cartoons and comic books; film adaptations; film spin offs and citations; pop music; literature and genre fiction; radio; U.K. television; U.S. television; theatre. Even though this reference work is overwhelmingly oriented to the Anglo-American world, it includes much material on a range of non-British European cases. It is, moreover, relevant to European Shakespeare by the sheer fact that many products of the Anglo-American media industry have been released on European markets too. [DD]

*

Burian, Orhan, “Shakespeare in Turkey” in Shakespeare Quarterly 8 (1958): 28-29


C

Calgari, Guido, “Fortuna di Shakespeare in Italia e in Francia” in Hesperia (Zurich), 3 (October 1953): 191-199

*

Calvani, Allessandra, “Rito e sacrificio nelle traduzioni di Otello: l’importanza delle scelte interpretative del traduttore in rapporto all’individuazione di chiavi di lettura del testo originale” in Intralinea 10 (2008) (on line at http://www.intralinea.it/volumes/eng_more.php?id=613_0_2_0_M65%)

This paper focuses on the importance of the translator’s interpretation of the text. Three Italian translations of Shakespeare’s Othello are analysed: Giulio Carcano’s, Raffaello Piccoli’s and Salvatore Quasimodo’s. Considering the possibility of a reading of this Shakespearian play from a ritual viewpoint, emphasized and defined by two words in particular, ‘rite’ and ‘sacrifice’, pronounced by Desdemona in Act I and by Othello in Act V, the paper moves on to consider the possibility of such a reading in the Italian translations. Each translator renders the original text according to his interpretation, making personal choices and highlighting elements which others had not noticed. [based on author’s abstract]

*

Campillo Arnaiz, Laura, “Shakespeare’s Neglected Translators: Jaime Clark and Guillermo Macpherson” in Thistles: a Homage to Brian Hughes. Essays in Memoriam. Edited by José Mateo Martínez and Francisco Yus Ramos, 27-37 (Alicante: Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Alicante, 2005)

Clark and Macpherson – interestingly enough, two British translators – led the effort to translate Shakespeare into Spanish directly from the originals rather than via French intertexts. They offered Spain a corpus of twenty-five translations that made up its Shakespearean canon until well into the twentieth century. Little is known about these two translators. This paper aims to provide an account of their lives, referring to several recently found documents. [DD]

*

Caretti, Laura (ed.), Il teatro del personaggio: Shakespeare sulle scene italiane dell’Ottocento (Roma: Bulzoni, 1979)

*

Carlson, Marvin, The Italian Shakespearians: Performances by Ristori, Salvini, and Rossi in England and America (Washington: The Folger Shakespeare Library, 1985)

An overview of nineteenth-century English and American Shakespeare productions featuring Italian star actors who performed their roles in Italian translation with the rest of the cast playing in English. These linguistically hybrid performances provide a curious example of incomplete translation. [DD]

*

Carlson, Marvin, “Daniel Mesguich and Intertextual Shakespeare” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 213-231 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

[Cartier, Jacqueline et al.], Le Petit Shakespeare. Collection Comédie française (Paris: Guy Authier, 1974)

*

Cetera, Anna, Enter Lear. The Translator’s Part in Performance (Warsaw: Warsaw University Press, 2008)

This book describes King Lear’s entry into the Polish cultural system from the eighteenth century down to the present day. The author is particularly interested in the translator’s intervention in the performance potential of the Shakespearean text: how can we trace the relationship between translation strategies and the stage history of King Lear? [DD]

*

Chasles, Philarète, Études sur W. Shakespeare, Marie Stuart, et l’Arétin (Paris: Amyot, 1851)

*

Chatenet, Jean, Shakespeare sur la scène française depuis 1940. Collection Théâtre 4 (Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1962)

A survey of (then) recent productions of Shakespeare in France. Relevant details are provided on various aspects such as the translation used, music and direction. [DD]

*

Checkley, C. S., Rumanian Interpretations of Hamlet (Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham, 1956)

*

Chew, Shirley and Alistair Stead (eds), Translating Life: Studies in Transpositional Aesthetics (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1999)

This volume is dedicated to Inga-Stina Ewbank. Much of the book uses the translation concept in an extended sense, for example construing translation as metaphorical expression, as a process of creative transposition, or as a paradigm of intertextuality. Topics discussed include translation in A Mid­sum­mer Night’s Dream, Laurence Olivier’s film ‘translation’ of Henry V, ‘trans­lating’ Shakespeare’s characters from page to stage, and Shakespeare translations in Africa. [DD]

*

Ciglar-Žanic, Janja, “Recruiting the Bard: Onstage and Offstage Glimpses of Recent Shakespeare Productions in Croatia” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 261-275 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Clark-Wehinger, Alice, William Shakespeare et Gérard de Nerval. Le théâtre romantique en crise, 1830-1848, (Paris: L’Harmattan, 2005)

A detailed study of Nerval’s “feuilletons dramatiques” written on the basis of plays inspired by, or adapted or plagiarized from the Shakespearean repertoire. This analysis highlights the leading role Nerval played as a defender of the idea of dramatic reform along with Gautier, Hugo and Demas despite his awareness of the conservatism of the French stage. [DD]

*

Classe, Olive (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Literary Translation into English, 2 vols (London and Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2000)

A survey of the field of literary translation into English, covering in principle all source literatures across space and time, and discussing a number of theoretical issues. The entry “Influence of Translations on William Shakespeare” briefly surveys the Elizabethan translations through which Shakespeare got to know the Bible, Montaigne and the classics. [DD]

*

Cobb, Lillian, Pierre-Antoine de La Place, sa vie et son œuvre (1707-1793) (Paris: E. de Broccard, 1928)

*

Cohn, Albert, Shakespeare in Germany in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries: An Account of English Actors in Germany and the Netherlands and of the Plays Performed by them during the Same Period (1865. Rpt. New York: Haskell House Publishers, 1971)

*

Cohn, Ruby, Modern Shakespeare Offshoots (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976)

An exercise in comparative drama which looks into mainly twentieth-century adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays (especially Macbeth, Hamlet, Lear and The Tempest) in English, French and German. Shakespeare rewriters discussed include Samuel Beckett, Bertolt Brecht, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Eugène Ionesco, Alfred Jarry, Charled Marowitz, Heiner Müller, George Bernard Shaw and Orson Welles. [DD]

*

Collison-Morley, Lacy, Shakespeare in Italy (Stratford-upon-Avon: Shakespeare Head Press, 1916. Rpt. New York: Benjamin Blom, 1967)

*

Condamin, James, “Un royal traducteur de Shakespeare, Louis, roi de Portugal” in his Études et Souvenirs (Paris: E. Leroux, 1883)

*

Conejero, Manuel Ángel, “Translating the Translation” in Shakespeare Worldwide 12 (1989): 94-113

*

Conejero, Manuel Ángel, Rhetoric, Theatre and Translation (Valencia: Fundación Shakespeare de España, 1992)

*

Conejero, Manuel Ángel, Vicent Montalt and Jesús Tronch, “Traduir Shakespeare al català: un esforç retòric i teatral” in Actes del Primer Congrés Internacional sobre Traducció, 899-906 (Barcelona: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 1997)

*

Conklin, Paul S., A History of Hamlet Criticism 1601-1821 (1947. Rpt. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1957)

The author investigates the growth of Hamlet criticism from its earliest recorded beginnings until 1821. He concerns himself primarily with the character of Hamlet and his place in the play. The study is alert to the dualism between the acted tradition and the published criticism. There are chapters on Shakespeare criticism in France and Germany and the author concludes his work quite refreshingly by calling “Hamlet criticism … today … truly international” and by underlining the pioneering part played by the French and German critics. [DD]

*

Corona, Mario, La fortuna di Shakespeare a Milano, 1800-1825. Biblioteca di studi inglesi (Bari: Adriatica, 1970)

*

Creizenach, Wilhelm Michael Anton, Die Schauspiele der englischen Komödianten (Stuttgart: W. Spemann, 1889)

*

Crinò, Anna Maria, Le traduzione di Shakespeare in Italia nel settecento (Rome: Edizione di Storia e Letteratura, 1950)

*

Cronin, Michael, “Rug-headed Kerns Speaking Tongues: Shakespeare, Translation and the Irish Language” in Shakespeare and Ireland: History, Politics, Culture. Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray, 193-212 (Houndmills: Macmillan, 1997)

*

Cronin, Michael, “The Smithy of the Soul: Shakespeare, Translation, and Identity” in Shakespeare and European Politics. With a foreword by Ton Hoenselaars. Edited by Dirk Delabastita, Jozef De Vos and Paul Franssen, 329-342 (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2008)

This essay traces the nexus between translation, eloquence, power and empire in Tudor England. A link is suggested between Shakespeare’s extension of the stylistic reach of the English language and the consolidation (monarchy) and expansion (empire) of England: “the more eloquent the English language, the better it was fitted to be the language of empire”. The power of translation – and thus the worrying possibility that bilinguals may exploit their power over monoglots with deceitful purposes – is demonstrated by a close reading of a few translation scenes from the history plays 2 Henry VI and Henry V. [DD]

*

Cummings, Peter, Shakespeare in Italy: Out of the Lost Years (Geneva, NY: Library Associates, Warren Hunting Smith Library, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1988)

*

Curtis, Jean-Louis, “Shakespeare et ses traducteurs français” in La traduction plurielle. Edited by Michel Ballard, 19-31 (Lille: Presses Universitaires de Lille, 1990)


D

Daniell, David, Coriolanus in Europe (London: The Athlone Press, 1980)

*

Dávidházi, Péter, “Cult and Criticism: Ritual in the European Reception of Shakespeare” in Literature and Its Cults: An Anthropological Approach / La littérature et ses cultes: Approche anthropologique. Edited by Péter Dávidházi and Judit Karafíath, 29-45 (Budapest: Argumentum, 1994)

*

Dávidházi, Péter, “Cult and Criticism: Ritual in the European Reception of Shakespeare” in Neohelicon 17:1 (1990): 59-78

*

Dávidházi, Péter, “The Domestication of Shakespeare in Hungary: The Nineteenth Century” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 37-45 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Dávidházi, Péter, “Providing Texts for a Literary Cult: Early Translations of Shakespeare in Hungary” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 147-162 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

A discussion of early Shakespearean translations in Hungary, discussed against the background of the nation’s Shakespeare cult, which went through several historical phases: initiation (1770s-1830s), mythicizing (early 1840s-1864), institutionalisation (1860s-early 1920s), iconoclasm (1920s-late 1950s), and secularization and revival (1960s-). Most attention goes to the first stage, when familiarity with Shakespeare was still derivative and had little textual support. The task of Hungarian translators was to provide textual material to nourish and justify the literary cult, which in turn had to exert a civilising influence and raise Hungary to the level of Europe’s most advanced countries. [DD]

*

Dávidházi, Péter, The Romantic Cult of Shakespeare: Literary Reception in an Anthropological Perspective (London: Macmillan, 1998)

Focusing mainly on England and Hungary in the period 1769-1864, the author re-examines the growth of Bardolatry, describing it as a cult revealing latent religious patterns. Religious psychology and anthropology provide the framework within which translations and other manifestations of this cult are contextualized. [DD]

*

Dávidházi, Péter and Judit Karafíath (eds), Literature and Its Cults: An Anthropological Approach / La littérature et ses cultes: Approche anthropologique (Budapest: Argumentum, 1994)

*

De Faria, Jorge, “O primeiro tradutor português de Shakespeare” in Mundo Gráfico 1:5 (1940): 15

*

De Hoog, W., Studiën over de Nederlandsche en Engelsche Taal en Letterkunde en haar wederzijdschen invloed. Second edition. 2 vols (Dordrecht: J.P. Revers, 1909)

A Dutch classic of comparative philology, which studies the linguistic and literary relationships and mutual influences between Dutch and English from Old Germanic times onwards. The second volume has interesting pages on Anglo-Dutch relationships in the Renaissance period and on the influence of Shakespeare in the Low Countries. [DD]

*

Delabastita, Dirk, “Hamlet in the Netherlands in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries: The Complexities of the History of Shakespeare’s Reception” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 219-236 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

This paper looks into the rather slow penetration of Shakespeare into the centre of literary and theatrical activity in the Low Countries. It then focuses on the oldest extant Dutch translations of Hamlet. The versions by Cambon van der Werken (1777) and Zubli (1786) are based on the same French intertext – Ducis – but show interesting variations. The anonymous prose translation (1778) based on Eschenburg shows an altogether different picture. Van den Bergh (1834) and Roorda van Eysinga (1836) point the way to the more faithful translation models of the future. [DD]

*

Delabastita, Dirk, There’s a Double Tongue: an Investigation into the Translation of Shakespeare’s Wordplay, with Special Reference to Hamlet (Amsterdam and Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 1993)

After presenting definitions of translation and the pun, this book tackles the translation of wordplay, first in terms of theoretical possibilities and obstacles, then in terms of concrete historical realities. Illustration is provided from Hamlet and other Shakespearean texts and many of their Dutch, French and German renderings. The final section consists in an anthology of the attested puns in Hamlet, including a brief semantic analysis of each, and a selection of diverse translations. [DD]

*

Delabastita, Dirk and Lieven D’hulst (eds), European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

This book sets out a programme for a more systematic study of Shakespearean translation. It concentrates on the romantic period, during which various cultural constituencies across Europe enlisted Shakespeare in their struggle for political emancipation, greater national identity and aesthetic innovation. Survey articles are combined with specific case studies, dealing with France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Low Countries, Portugal, Russia, Scandinavia and the West Slavic cultures. [DD]

*

Delabastita, Dirk, “A Great Feast of Languages: Shakespeare’s Multilingual Comedy in King Henry V and the Translator” in The Translator 8:2 (2002): 303-340

Henry V exploits multilingualism for both comic and non-comic purposes. These various functions are described before the paper moves on to explore the unique challenges that this polyglot play poses to the translator. Special attention is given to the rendering of the French-English bilingual comic scenes into French. Given that much of Shakespeare’s joking in Henry V involves national stereotyping and serves a nationalistic agenda, the translators have understandably been swayed in their choices by political sensitivities, but a range of other factors play a role as well (knowledge of foreign languages, historical connotations attached to languages, conventions for language representation, translation norms, textual norms, etc.). [DD]

*

Delabastita, Dirk, “Anthologies, Translations, and European Identities” in Shakespeare and European Politics. With a foreword by Ton Hoenselaars. Edited by Dirk Delabastita, Jozef De Vos and Paul Franssen, 343-368 (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2008)

This essay discusses the need for historians of literature, translation and culture to move beyond the still prevalent ‘national’ model of historiography. Many of the flows of people and texts that have contributed to the spread of Shakespeare happen below or above the level of ‘national importance’. It is indeed this permanent interplay and redefinition of local, national and international developments that generates the dynamic of Shakespeare’s afterlife. The argument is illustrated by a discussion of the European Union as a new political and cultural entity: the essay looks at a few French anthologies of ‘European literature’ and the ideological determinations of how they deal with Europe’s linguistic and cultural diversity. [DD]

*

Delabastita, Dirk, Jozef De Vos and Paul Franssen (eds), Shakespeare and European Politics. With a foreword by Ton Hoenselaars (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2008)

This collection of essays grew out of the 2003 ESRA conference in Utrecht. It looks at Shakespearean culture across Europe from a specifically political angle. Its twenty essays come in four separately prefaced sections: Geography, history, and politics; Politics and/on the stage; The politics of criticism; Translating politics, politicizing translation. Papers deal with issues of European religion, culture and politics in Shakespeare’s work, as well as with how such issues have affected his many afterlives in context as diverse as the emergence of nation states, the two World Wars, 1960s feminism, 9/11 and the formation of the European Union. [DD]

*

Delisle, Jean and Judith Woodsworth (eds), Translators through History (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1995)

This book aims to provide the groundwork for a study of the major contribution made by translators to the intellectual and cultural history of the world, for example in areas such as the invention of alphabets, the emergence of national literatures, the propagation of religious texts and so on. One of its subsections is devoted to the international spread of Shakespeare. [DD]

*

De Vos, Jozef, Shakespeare in Flanders: A Study of the Theatrical, Critical and Literary Reception of Shakespeare’s Work (PhD thesis, University of Ghent, 1976)

*

De Vos, Jozef, “Shakespeare en het culturele leven in Zuid-Nederland” in Handelingen van de Koninklijke Zuidnederlandse Maatschappij voor Taal- en Letterkunde en Geschiedenis 32 (1978): 61-96, and 33 (1979): 131-189

*

D’haen, Theo and Nadia Lie (eds), Constellation Caliban: Figurations of a Character (Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodopi, 1997)

This collection looks at a number of specific refigurations of Caliban. Case studies deal with various authors who have been inspired by the figure of Caliban (Robert Browning, Arnold Zweig, Ernest Renan, Aimé Césaire, W.H. Auden, John Banville…) as well as with critical, cinematographic and iconographical responses to the character of Caliban. [DD]

*

Dobson, Michael, The Making of the National Poet: Shakespeare, Adaptation, and Authorship, 1660-1769 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992)

The century between the Restoration in 1660 and David Garrick’s Stratford Jubilee in 1769 saw William Shakespeare’s promotion from the status of archaic, rustic playwright to that of England’s timeless Bard, and with it the complete transformation of the ways in which his plays were staged, published and read. This book looks at the Restoration’s and eighteenth century’s revisions and revaluations of Shakespeare, and considers the period’s much-reviled stage adaptations in the context of the profound cultural changes in which they participate. Drawing on a wide range of evidence (including engravings, promptbooks, diaries and previously unpublished poems), it examines how and why Shakespeare was retrospectively claimed as both a respectable Enlightenment author and a crucial and contested symbol of British national identity. [based on blurb]

*

Dobson, Michael, and Stanley Wells (eds), The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001)

This reference work has an insightful article on ‘translation’ in addition to some forty concise entries on individual translators of Shakespeare (from Luis Astrana Marín to Shenghao Zhu). It also contains a series of entries on the reception of Shakespeare in thirty-five countries and regions, ranging from ‘Arab world’ to ‘West Africa’. [DD]

*

Downs, Brian W., “Anglo-Norwegian Relations, 1867-1900” in Modern Language Review 42 (1952): 449-494

*

Drahomanov, M., “The Taming of the Shrew in the Folklore of the Ukraine” in Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the US 2 (1952): 214-218

*

Duarte, João Ferreira, “The Politics of Non-Translation: A Case Study in Anglo-Portuguese Relations” in TTR: traduction, terminologie, rédaction 13:1 (2000), 95-112

*

Dubeux, Albert, Les Traductions françaises de Shakespeare. Études françaises Cahier 15 (Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1928)

Despite its age and slim size, this still an interesting volume with an essay on the history of French Shakespeare translations, followed by a detailed and wide-ranging bibliographical “liste chronologique des traductions et adaptations françaises de Shakespeare” including a separate list of “Éditions illustrées” and even of “adaptations cinématographiques”. [DD]

*

Düntzer, Heinrich, “Shakespeare und der junge Goethe” in his Zur Goetheforschung (Stuttgart: Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt, 1891)

*

Duţu, Alexandru, Shakespeare in Rumania: A Bibliographical Essay. With an Introduction by Mihnea Gheorghiu (Bucharest: Meridiane Publishing House, 1964)


E

Egri, Péter, “Whose Immortality is It Anyway? The Hungarian Translations of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 207-234 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Einarsson, Stefán, Shakespeare á Islandi (Winnipeg: The Viking Press, 1939)

*

Einarsson, Stefán, “Shakespeare in Iceland: An Historical Survey” in Journal of English Literary History 7 (1940): 272-285

*

Elze, Karl, Die englische Sprache und Literatur in Deutschland: Eine Festschrift zur dreihundertjärigen Geburtstagsfeier Shakespeares (Dresden: Ehlermann, 1864)

*

Elze, Karl, “Hamlet in Frankreich” (1865)

*

Engel, C. E., “Shakespeare in Switzerland in the Eighteenth Century” in Comparative Literature Studies 17-18 (1945): 2-8

*

Engel, J., “Shakespeare in Frankreich” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 34 (1898): 66-118

*

England, Martha Winburn, “Garrick’s Stratford Jubilee: Reactions in France and Germany” in Shakespeare Survey 9 (1956): 90-100

*

England, Martha Winburn, Garrick’s Jubilee (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1964)

*

Engle, Ron, “Audience, Style, and Language in the Shakespeare of Peter Zadek” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 93-105 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

English, Richard, “Shakespeare and the Definition of the Irish Nation” in Shakespeare and Ireland: History, Politics, Culture. Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray, 136-151 (Houndmills: Macmillan, 1997)

*

Erckenbrecht, Ulrich, Shakespeare Sechsundsechzig: Variationen über ein Sonett. Erweiterte Ausgabe (Kassel: Muriverlag, 2001)

This unusual book offers a compilation of no fewer than 132 German translations of sonnet 66 (“Tired with all these...”). The ‘anthological’ presentation of different versions of the same source text creates a multi-faceted prism through which the textual density and the semiotic productivity of the original stand out no less clearly than the endless resourcefulness of the successive German translators. It also prompts multiple comparisons between the translations, an exercise started by Erckenbrecht’s long introductory essay, which matches philological scrupulousness with a more personal touch. [DD]

*

Espasa Borràs, Eva, La traducció dalt de l’escenari (Vic: Eumo Editorial, 2001)

This Catalan study aims to come to grips with the specific problems involved in translating for the theatre. The author develops a comprehensive semiotic model of theatrical communication which accommodates and interconnects two types of translation: the rendering of a foreign play in the receptor language and the transposition of the written script into the performance text. Espasa studies stage versions and Catalan translations of The Merry Wives of Windsor and Measure for Measure. [DD]

*

Esquerra, Ramón, Shakespeare a Catalunya (Barcelona: Generalitat de Catalunya, 1937)

*

Estorninho, Carlos, “Shakespeare na Literatura Portuguesa” in Ocidente 67:113 (1964): 114-123

*

Etkind, Efim, “Shakespeare in der russischen Dichtung des Goldnen Zeitalters (1808-1840)” in Das Shakespeare-Bild in Europa zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik. Edited by Roger Bauer, 241-261 (Bern: Peter Lang, 1988)

*

Études anglaises (Paris: Didier, 1947-)

This well-established journal publishes at least one article on Shakespeare per year. The editors brought out a special issue on Shakespeare’s presence in France, Shakespeare en France (13:2, 1960), followed by Shakespeare 1564-1964 (17:4, 1964). The former especially has helpful material on the French translators. [DD]

*

Ewbank, Inga-Stina, “Shakespeare Translation as Cultural Exchange” in Shakespeare Survey 48 (1995), 1-12

This essay develops the metaphor of translation as a mutually beneficial cultural exchange and urges the community of Shakespearean scholars to give up their customary insularity. [DD]

*

Ezpeleta, Pilar, El análisis del texto dramático para la traducción, el caso de Shakespeare (PhD thesis, Universitat de València, 2000)

*

Ezpeleta Piorno, Pilar, Teatro y traducción: aproximación interdisciplinaria desde la obra de Shakespeare (Madrid: Catedra 2007)


F

Fabiny, Tibor, “King Lear’s Significance in the New Hungarian Political Context, 1989-1995” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 191-206 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Fischlin, Daniel and Mark Fortier (eds), Adaptations of Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology of Plays from the Seventeenth Century to the Present (London and New York: Routledge, 2000)

An attractive anthology which brings together twelve theatrical adaptations of Shakespeare’s work from around the world and across the centuries, beginning with John Fletcher’s The Woman’s Prize and ending with the late-twentieth-century Othello rewriting Harlem Duet by Djanet Sears. The work of the non-English adapters – Federico García Lorca, Bertolt Brecht, Welcome Msomi and Heiner Müller – has been back-translated into English so unobtrusively as to make them look like English authors. The introduction and commentaries lean towards Gender Studies and post-colonial theory without entering into a dialogue with Translation Studies. [DD]

*

Fitzgerald, Thomas A., “Shakespeare in Spain and Spanish America” in Modern Language Journal 35 (1951): 589-594

*

Fluchère, Henri, “Shakespeare in France: 1900-1948” in Shakespeare Survey 2 (1949): 115-125

*

Folio (Utrecht: Shakespeare Society of the Low Countries, 1994-)

Folio is the biannual (and bilingual, English-Dutch) journal of the Shakespeare Society of the Low Countries. It keeps its finger on the pulse of Dutch translations and productions and shows a consistent interest in the international spread of Shakespeare more generally. [DD]

*

Forsyth, Neil, “Shakespeare the European” in Translating/traduire/tradurre Shakespeare. Edited by Irene Weber Henking, 5-21 (Lausanne: Centre de Traduction Littéraire de Lausanne, 2001)

*

France, Peter (ed.), The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)

Despite its smaller size, this first-rate reference work is in several respects comparable to Classe’s Encyclopedia (see above). There is a scattering of indexed references to Shakespeare, who is viewed not as a translated author but as a user of Elizabethan translations of classical and European works. [DD]

*

Frank, Armin Paul, et al. (eds), Übersetzung: Ein internationales Handbuch zur Übersetzungs­wissenschaft. 3 vols (Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2004-2010)

This ambitious encyclopedia of Translation Studies, with articles in German, English and French, aims to be a comprehensive and critical account of the current state of knowledge and research. A section of essay-length entries in the third volume investigates the worldwide reception of Shakespeare as a major instance of international dissemination through translation. [DD]

*

Frank, Tibor, “‘Give Me Shakespeare’: Lajos Kossuth’s English as an Instrument of International Politics” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 47-73 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Franz, Wilhelm, Shakespeare als Kulturkraft in Deutschland und England (Tübingen: Kloeres, 1916)

*

Friederichs, E., “Shakespeare in Rußland” in Englische Studien 1 (1916): 106-136

*

Fujita, Minoru and Leonard Pronko (eds), Shakespeare East and West (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996)

*

Funke, Otto, Die Schweiz und die englische Literatur: Ein Vortrag (Bern: A. Francke, 1937)


G

Garber, Marjorie, Shakespeare’s Ghost Writers: Literature as Uncanny Causality (New York and London: Routledge, 1987)

*

Gatti, H., Shakespeare nei teatri milanesidell’Ottocento (Bari: Adriatica, 1968)

*

Gay, Peter, “Freud and the Man from Stratford” in his Reading Freud: Explorations and Entertainments, 5-53 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1990)

*

Gebhardt, Peter, A. W. Schlegels Shakespeare-Übersetzung: Untersuchungen zu seinem Übersetzungs­verfahren am Beispiel des Hamlet (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck 1970 & Ruprecht)

This book is a relatively rare example of a monograph entirely devoted to a single Shakespeare translation. The first part sketches the historical and general esthetic background to Schlegel’s famous translation. The second part looks in a very detailed manner at his 1798 translation of Hamlet specifically, including the textual problems that it poses, and a whole range of special translation issues such as verse, syntax, taboo words, wordplay, and so on. [DD]

*

Géher, István, “Hamlet the Hungarian: A Living Moment” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 75-87 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Genée, Rudolf, Geschichte der Shakespeare’schen Dramen in Deutschland (Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann, 1870)

*

Genée, Rudolf, A. W. Schlegel und Shakespeare: Ein Beitrag zur Würdigung der Schlegel’schen Übersetzungen (Berlin: Georg Reimer, 1904)

*

George, Emery, “Twelfth Night by Two Translators: A Homogeneous Text” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 143-167 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Gervinus, Georg Gottfried, Händel und Shakespeare (Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann, 1868)

*

Gheorghiu, Mihnea, Shakespeare in Rumania (Bucharest: Intreprinderea Poligrafica “Informatia,” 1964)

*

Gibian, George, “Shakespeare in Soviet-Russia” in Russian Review 11 (1952): 24-34

*

Gibińska, Marta, “Polish Hamlets: Shakespeare’s Hamlet in Polish Theatres after 1945” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 159-173 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Gibińska, Marta, Polish Poets Read Shakespeare: Refashioning of the Tradition (Kraków: Towarzystwo Naukowe “Societas Vistulana,” 1999)

*

Gibińska, Marta and Jerzy Limon (eds), Hamlet East-West (Gdansk: Theatrum Gedanense Foundation, 1998)

*

Gilman, Margaret, Othello in French. Bibliothèque de la Revue de Littérature Comparée 21 (Paris: E. Champion, 1925)

*

Golder, John, Shakespeare for the Age of Reason: The Earliest Stage Adaptations of Jean-Francois Ducis 1769-1792 (Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 1992)

*

Golder, John, “‘Mon Sans-Culotte Africain’: A French Revolutionary Stage Othello” in Shakespeare: World Views. Edited by Heather Kerr, Robin Eaden and Madge Mitten, 146-155 (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1996)

*

Golub, Spencer, “Between the Curtain and the Grave: The Taganka in the Hamlet Gulag” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 158-177 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

Gomes da Torre, Manuel, “Um problema de Género na Tradução para Português de A Midsummer Night’s Dream” in Génesis 3 (2003): 35-52

In A Midsummer Night’s Dream (3.1) Bottom addresses some fairies as “master” (e.g. Master Cobweb), i.e. as a male being. When the play is translated into Portuguese, translators should pay attention to this issue, as the Portuguese equivalent for fairy is ‘fada’, which is grammatically a feminine noun. The paper looks at existing Portuguese translations and defends the author’s position that the fairies should be made feminine in Portuguese translation. [DD]

*

Gömöri, George, “Shakespeare in Milán Füst’s Writings” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 131-142 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

González Fernández de Sevilla, José Manuel (ed.), Shakespeare en España. Crítica, traducciones y representaciones (Alicante: Universidad de Alicante and Zaragoza: Pórtico, 1993)

A collection of essays (all written in Spanish) dealing with the Spanish reception of Shakespeare and divided into three parts: criticism, translations and stage history. The section on translation features essays by leading translators as well as two papers focusing on the Basque and the Catalan traditions. The volume includes a helpful bibliographical section. [DD]

*

González Fernández de Sevilla, José Manuel (ed.), Spanish Studies in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2006)

The sixteen papers in this book represent a generous sampling of current Shakespeare and Renaissance studies in Spain. Several papers deal with Shakespearean texts (Venus and Adonis and several of the great plays) or other Early Modern English topics (Marlowe, Jonson, Donne…); others look specifically at the history of Spanish perceptions and representations of Shakespeare. [DD]

*

Goy-Blanquet, Dominique, “Warner, Stein, and Mesguich Have a Cut at Titus Andronicus” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 36-55 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

Goy-Blanquet, Dominique, “Translating Europe into Your England” in Shakespeare and European Politics. With a foreword by Ton Hoenselaars. Edited by Dirk Delabastita, Jozef De Vos and Paul Franssen, 286-303 (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2008)

This essay scrutinizes the covert way in which Elizabethan culture eagerly absorbed foreign texts and discourses without acknowledging their imported status. Its central theme is Jocasta, a tragedy based on Euripides’ Phoenissae rendered into English by George Gascoigne in 1566. It was possibly the only Greek play available in English during the Elizabethan age and it seems to have influenced Shakespeare. The essay compares the play with its Greek source and pays ample attention to the sequence of Latin and Italian intermediate versions on which Gascoigne depended – a textual indebtedness to which many nationalistically minded English scholars seem to have turned a blind eye. [DD]

*

Gregor, Graham Keith, “Spanish Shakespeare-manía: Twelfth Night in Madrid, 1996-97” in Shakespeare Quarterly 49:4 (1998): 421-431

*

Gregor, Keith and Ángel Luis Pujante (eds), More European Shakespeares. Special issue of Cuadernos de Filología Inglesa 7:2 (Murcia: Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Murcia, 2001)

A selection of eight papers presented at the 1999 Murcia conference on ‘Four Centuries of Shakespeare in Europe’ (see also Pujante & Hoenselaars below). Topics discussed include the divergent perceptions of Isabella (Measure for Measure) in criticism, translation and production, Polish appropriations of Shakespeare, Romanian productions of the romances, the Spanish tradition of translating Shakespeare, and the Spanish response to film and television adaptations of Shakespeare. [DD]

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Greguss, Ágost, Shakespeare in Ungarn (Budapest, 1879)

*

Grein, Jacob T., “Shakespeare in Hungary” in The Illustrated London News, 13 December 1924: 1165

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Greiner, Norbert, “The Comic Matrix of Early German Shakespeare Translation” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 203-217 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

In the big debates in which Shakespeare played a part in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the tragedies and even the histories play a more prominent part than the comedies, which were less suitable for the definition of cultural or national paradigms. This essay addresses this somewhat marginalized genre and Germany’s responses to Shakespeare’s comic genius. Authors and translators discussed include G.E. Lessing, Chr. M. Wieland, J.M.R. Lenz and A.W. Schlegel as well as the composer Mendelssohn. [DD]

*

Grillo, Ernesto, Shakespeare and Italy (Glasgow: R. Maclehose, 1949. Rpt. New York: Haskell House, 1973)

*

Gundolf, Friedrich, Shakespeare und der deutsche Geist (Berlin: Georg Bondi, 1914. Revised edition of F. Gundelfinger, Shakespeare und der deutsche Geist vor dem Auftreten Lessings. Heidelberg, 1911)

Friedrich Leopold Gundelfinger was Gundolf’s real name, showing his Jewish ancestry. Shakespeare und der deutsche Geist was initially his Habilitationsschrift. This notorious and highly influential book, published on the eve of World War I, claims that at a deeper spiritual level Shakespeare was a German writer as much as an English one. The greatness of Shakespeare transcends the limits of biographical history and permitted him to play a decisive role in the formation of a unified German cultural identity and to become a perfect expression of the “German spirit”. [DD]

*

Guntner, J. Lawrence, “Brecht and Beyond: Shakespeare on the East German Stage” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 109-139 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

Guntner, J. Lawrence and Andrew M. McClean (eds), Redefining Shakespeare: Literary Theory and Theater Practice in the German Democratic Republic (Delaware: University of Delaware Press, 1998)

A stimulating collection of essays and interviews focusing on how Shakespeare was performed, translated, criticized and understood within the cultural context of East German social history. [DD]

*

Gury, Jacques, “Shakespearomanie et subversion?” in Modèles et moyens de la réflexion politique au XVIIIe siècle. 3 vols (Lille: Publications de l’Université de Lille III, 1977-1979) (in vol. III: Débats et combats idéologiques: sociétés de pensée, loges, clubs (1979), 227-241)

*

Gury, Jacques, “Heurs et malheurs de Roméo et Juliette en France à l’époque romantique” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 187-202 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

A discussion of the state of Shakespeare translation in France during and after the romantic debates of the 1820s, with a special focus on the competing or parallel versions of Romeo and Juliet, including the unsuccessful performance of Ducis’ adaptation (1827), the failed joint project of Alfred Vigny and Émile Deschamps in the 1820s, Deschamps’ continued efforts to translate the play on his own, Philarète Chasles’ translation (1836), and the various reprints and revisions of the Le Tourneur translation (1776-1783). The paper emphasizes the lasting influence of the latter several decades after its first publication. [DD]

*

Gyulai, Ágost, Shakespeare in Hungary (London: Gale & Polden, 1908)


H

Habicht, Werner, “Shakespeare and Theatre Politics in the Third Reich” in The Play Out of Context: Transferring Plays from Culture to Culture. Edited by Hanna Scolnicov and Peter Holland, 110-121 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989)

*

Habicht, Werner, “The Romanticism of the Schlegel-Tieck Shakespeare and the History of Nineteenth-Century German Shakespeare Translation” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 45-53 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

The essay reviews the factual history of the Schlegel/Tieck/Baudissin translations and relates them to Schlegel’s view of Shakespeare’s drama as organic poetry. This view requires that the translator should attempt to recreate the entire organism of the source text. It turns out, however, that Schlegel’s renderings are selective in their perception of which dimensions of the original should be given priority. Thus, his ideal of stylistic beauty resulted in other Shakespearean features being sidelined (puns, metrical irregularities, allusions...). The essay goes on to illustrate how different translators in the nineteenth century and even beyond responded to the romanticism of the Schlegel versions. [DD]

*

Habicht, Werner, Shakespeare and the German Imagination. International Shakespeare Association: Occasional Paper 5 (Hertford: Stephen Austin and Sons, 1994)

This essay explores the ‘Germanness’ of Shakespeare, i.e. the idea that Shakespeare has a unique affinity with German culture despite the biographical facts and perhaps even overriding them. Such beliefs were held from the mid-eighteenth century onwards and that is where this essay takes its start. From the Sturm und Drang Habicht moves on to discuss how the German romantics identified with Shakespeare and how the process of ‘nostrification’ continued throughout the nineteenth century, leading to some extreme positions at the outbreak of WW1 and from the end of WW2 onwards progressively dissolving into a less possessive and more cosmopolitan perception of Shakespeare. [DD]

*

Habicht, Werner, “Topoi of the Shakespeare Cult in Germany” in Literature and Its Cults: An Anthropological Approach / La littérature et ses cultes: Approche anthropologique. Edited by Péter Dávidházi and Judit Karafíath, 47-65 (Budapest: Argumentum, 1994)

*

Haines, Charles Moline, Shakespeare in France. Criticism: Voltaire to Victor Hugo (London: Oxford University Press, 1925. Rpt. New York: AMS Press, 1975)

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Hamburger, Maik, “‘Are You a Party in This Business?’: Consolidation and Subversion in East German Shakespeare Productions” in Shakespeare Survey 48 (1995): 171-184

*

Haraszti, Zoltán, Shakespeare in Hungary: His Plays on the Stage and His Influence in Literature and Life (Boston, MA: The Trustees of the Public Library, 1929)

*

Harbage, Alfred, “Shakespeare as Culture Hero” in his Conceptions of Shakespeare, 101-119 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1966)

*

Harnack, O., Über Goethes Verhältnis zu Shakespeare. Essais und Studien (Brunswick, Germany, 1899)

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Harries, Frederick J., Shakespeare and the Welsh (1919. Rpt. New York: Haskell House Publishers, 1972)

*

Hattaway, Michael, “Shakespeare’s Histories: The Politics of Recent British Productions” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 351-369 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Hattaway, Michael, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper (eds), Shakespeare in the New Europe (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

This collection of essays is based on a conference, held near Sofia in 1993, which had been planned shortly after the collapse of the communist regimes in Middle and Eastern Europe and with nationalist fervour and hostility in the Balkans building up. The collection conveys the thrill and the insecurities of the moment, with half of its twenty or so essays exploring the often contradictory functions of Shakespeare in countries or regions such as East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, the (former) USSR, Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia; other essays deal with the reception of Shakespeare in post-Franco Spain or with themes such as nationhood, tribalism and ideology. [DD]

*

Hauffen, A., Shakespeare in Deutschland (Prague, 1893)

*

Hauptmann, Gerhart, “Deutschland und Shakespeare” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 51 (1915): vii-xii

This provocative essay – originally a speech delivered to the German Shakespeare-Gesellschaft – is a famous case of ‘nostrification’. Hauptmann claims that deep down Shakespeare is really German more than English. A few years earlier, before the outbreak of World War I, Friedrich Gundolf (1911) had voiced similarly domesticating attitudes to Shakespeare. [DD]

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Hawkes, Terence, “Shakespeare’s Spooks, or Someone to Watch Over Me” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 194-206 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Hawkings, Harriet, “Shakespeare’s Radical Romanticism: The Popular Tradition and the Challenge of Tribalism” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 278-293 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Healy, Tom, “Past and Present Shakespeare’s: Shakespearian Appropriations in Europe” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 202-232 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

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Healy, Thomas, “Remembering with Advantages: Nation and Ideology in Henry V” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 174-193 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Heftrich, Eckhardt, “Shakespeare in Weimar” in Das Shakespeare-Bild in Europa zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik. Edited by Roger Bauer, 182-200 (Bern: Peter Lang, 1988)

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Heliodora, Barbara, “Shakespeare in Brazil” in Shakespeare Survey 20 (1967): 121-124

*

Hempfner, Klaus W., “Shakespeare, Voltaire, Baretti und die Kontextabhängigkeit” in Das Shakespeare-Bild in Europa zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik. Edited by Roger Bauer, 77-101 (Bern: Peter Lang, 1988)

*

Henriques, Alf, Shakespeare og Danmark indtil 1840 (Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 1941)

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Henriques, Alf, “Shakespeare and Denmark, 1900-1949” in Shakespeare Survey 3 (1950): 107-115

*

Herford, C. H., “A Sketch of the History of Shakespeare’s Influence on the Continent” in Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 9 (1925): 20-62

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Herz, E., Englische Schauspieler und englisches Schauspiel zur Zeit Shakespeares in Deutschland (Hamburg: Voss, 1903)

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Heun, Hans Georg, Shakespeare in deutschen Übersetzungen (Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1957)

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Heylen, Romy, Translation, Poetics, and the Stage: Six French ‘Hamlets’ (London and New York: Routledge, 1993)

Heylen defends a socio-cultural model of translation, focusing on how translations function in the receiving culture through a process of ‘acculturation’. Her book consists of six case studies, each one representing a step in the French translation of Hamlet, starting with Jean-François Ducis’ 1769 neoclassical version of the play and ending with the postmodern stage production of Daniel Mesguich from 1977. [DD]

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Hevesi, Sándor, Az igazi Shakespeare és egyéb kérdések [The Real Shakespeare and Other Questions] (Budapest: Táltos, 1919)

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Hilský, Martin, “Shakespeare in Czech: An Essay in Cultural Semantics” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 150-158 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Hoch, Horace Lind, Shakespeare’s Influence upon Grabbe (Philadelphia, PA, n.p., 1910)

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Hodgdon, Barbara, The Shakespeare Trade: Performances and Appropriations (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998)

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Hoenselaars, Ton, “Recycling Shakespeare in the Low Countries” in The Low Countries 6 (1999): 203-211

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Hoenselaars, Ton and Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen, “Abraham Sybant Tames The Taming of the Shrew for the Amsterdam Stage (1654)” in Ilha do desterro: A Journal of English Language, Literatures in English, and Cultural Studies (Brazil), 36 (1999): 53-70

*

Hoenselaars, Ton (ed.), Shakespeare and the Language of Translation. The Arden Shakespeare (London: Thomson Learning, 2004)

This is the first full-length book coming from within the established centre of Shakespeare studies (Arden) to address the translation of Shakespeare’s works. There are essays on a range of topics: multilingualism and translation in Shakespeare’s works; translating Shakespeare and gender; Shakespeare in Chinese, Japanese, Scots and Sign Language; rendering the verbal fireworks of Love’s Labour’s Lost; translating Shakespeare for the stage, or for a bilingual edition; issues of copyright; renderings for Quebec and for Johannesburg; etc. [DD]

*

Hofmann, Norbert, Redundanz und Äquivalenz in der literarischen Übersetzung dargestellt an fünf deutschen Übersetzungen des Hamlet (Tübingen: Max Niemeyer,1980)

The author sets up a complex model for the study of theatrical translations which incorporates components of linguistics, information theory and cognitive psychology. He examines various forms of linguistic and esthetic redundancy within a literary and dramatic text and argues that these should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the equivalence between originals and translations. This model is then applied to five translations of Hamlet (Schlegel, Rothe, Flatter, Schaller and Fried). [DD]

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Hogan, Patrick Colm, “Shakespeare, Eastern Theatre, and Literary Universals: Drama in the Context of Cognitive Science” in Shakespeare East and West. Edited by Minoru Fujita and Leonard Pronko, 164-180 (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996)

*

Holderness, Graham, “Franco Zeffirelli (1966)” in his The Taming of the Shrew, 49-72 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1989)

*

Holderness, Graham (ed.), The Shakespeare Myth (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988)

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Holderness, Graham and Andrew Murphey, “Shakespeare’s England: Britain’s Shakespeare” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 19-41 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

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Holland, Norman H., Psychoanalysis and Shakespeare (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1966)

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Holland, Peter, English Shakespeares: Shakespeare on the English Stage in the 1990s (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997)

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Homem, Rui Carvalho, “Of Negroes, Jews and Kings: On a Nineteenth-Century Royal Translator” in The Translator 7: 1 (2001): 19-42

Luís I of Portugal (1838-1889, King from 1861), also a man of letters and a patron of the arts, translated and published Hamlet (1877),’The Merchant of Venice (1879), Richard III (1880) and Othello (1885). His translations are often mentioned but seldom considered in any detail. This article reads them as the work of a late nineteenth-century monarch faced with the perplexities of royal power within a constitutional monarchy, of colonial power as held by a small nation in an increasingly competitive European scene, and of a society more and more determined by bourgeois mores. Issues of power, race, gender and sex thus gain particular prominence in this study. [based on author’s abstract]

*

Horn-Monval, Madeleine, Les traductions françaises de Shakespeare (Paris: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1963)

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Horstmann, Gesa, Shakespeares Sonette in Deutschland. Zur Geschichte der Übersetzungen zwischen dem 18. Jahrhundert und den Übertragungen von Stefan George und Karl Kraus (PhD thesis, TU Berlin, 2002)

This study gives a historical survey and critical analysis of the translations of the Sonnets into German from the beginning – the prose translations by J.J. Eschenburg (1787) until the versions of Stefan George (1909) and Karl Kraus (1933). Most attention is given to the nineteenth-century versions and to the controversy between George and Kraus. [DD]

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Horstmann, Gesa, “Shakespeare als deutscher Klassiker – die deutschen Übersetzungen von Shakespeares Sonetten zwischen institutioneller Monumentalisierung, nationaler Identitätsfindung und privatem Lesevergnügen” in Übersetzung antiker Literatur. Funktionen und Konzeptionen im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert. Edited by Martin Harbsmeier et al., 135-154 (Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2008)

Hortmann, Wilhelm, “Word into Image: Notes on the Scenography of Recent German Productions” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 232-253 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

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Hortmann, Wilhelm, Shakespeare on the German Stage: The Twentieth Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998)

A worthy sequel to Williams (below), with special emphasis on the broader cultural and political contexts of Shakespearean practice in Germany in the twentieth century. The book features a special section by Maik Hamburger on Shakespeare performances in the German Democratic Republic. [DD]

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Huesmann, Heinrich, Shakespeare-Inszenierungen unter Goethe in Weimar (Vienna: Hermann Böhlaus Nachf., 1968)

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Hughes, Arthur Edward, Shakespeare and his Welsh Characters (1919. Rpt. Folcroft, PA: Folcroft Library Editions, 1973)

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Hünig, Angela, Übersetzung im Schatten des Kanons: Untersuchungen zur Deutschen Shakespeare Übersetzung im 19. Jahrhundert am Beispiel des Coriolanus (PhD thesis, Pädagogischen Hochschule Erfurt, 1999)


I

Inbar, Eva Maria, Shakespeare in Deutschland: Der Fall Lenz. Studien zur deutschen Literatur 67 (Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag, 1982)


J

Jackson, John E., “What’s in a Sonnet? Translating Shakespeare” in Translating/traduire/tradurre Shakespeare. Edited by Irene Weber Henking, 57-73 (Lausanne: Centre de Traduction Littéraire de Lausanne, 2001)

*

Jacobowski, L., Klinger und Shakespeare: Ein Beitrag zur Shakespearomanie der Sturm- und Drangperiode (Freiburg, 1891)

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Jacquot, Jean, Shakespeare en France: Mise en scène d’hier et d’aujourd’hui (Paris: Le Temps, 1964)

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Jansohn, Christa (ed.), William Shakespeare. ‘A Lover’s Complaint’: Deutsche Übersetzungen von 1787-1894 (Berlin: Erich Schmidt, 1993)

After a discussion of the original poem, Jansohn quotes and analyzes the twelve German translations she managed to unearth: the first one, in prose, by J. J. Eschenburg (1787), the last one, in verse, by Alfred von Mauntz (1894). This is one of the very few studies dealing with the renderings of Shakespeare’s narrative poetry. [DD]

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Jensen, Niels Lyhne, “Shakespeare in Denmark” in Durham University Journal 56 (1963/1964): 91-98

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Johnson, David, Shakespeare and South Africa (Oxford: Clarendon Press, and New York: Oxford University Press, 1996)

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Johnson, Lemuel A., Shakespeare in Africa (and Other Venues): Import and the Appropriation of Culture (Trenton N.J. and Asmara, Eritrea: Africa World Press, 1998)

Johnson moves freely between criticism (with Othello and The Tempest receiving most attention), discussions of Shakespearean appropriations worldwide, and diverse other, more or less related issues. Its postmodern élan prevents the work from delivering the systematic survey that the title may have led the reader to expect, but there are several useful starting points for the student of African Shakespeare translations. [DD]

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Joughin, John J. (ed.), Shakespeare and National Culture (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

A collection of eleven essays concerned with nationalistically inspired appropriations of Shakespeare. As a critical intervention in the ‘Shakespeare debate’ of the 1990s, much of the book addresses the ideology of teaching and promoting Shakespeare within Britain, but a few essays explore the theme of Shakespeare and nationalism within a European or post-colonial context.

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Joughin, John J., “Shakespeare, National Culture and the Lure of Transnationalism” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 269-294 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

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Juliá Martínez, Eduardo, Shakespeare en España. Traducciones, imitaciones e influencia de las obras de Shakespeare en la literatura española (Madrid: Tip. de la “Rev. de Arch., Bibl. y Museos,” 1918)

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Jusserand, Jean Jules, Shakespeare en France sous l’Ancien Régime (Paris: Armand Colin, 1898. Rpt. New York: American Scholar Publications, 1966)

Jusserand was a historian and high-ranking diplomat (serving in London and Washington); this massive monograph is one of his many books in the field of English studies. His study of Shakespeare’s reception in France is usefully placed against the wider background of Anglo-French relationships, the survey of which starts from Shakespeare’s lifetime and ends with Ducis, Chateaubriand and Mme de Staël. [DD]


K

Kahn, Ludwig, Shakespeares Sonette in Deutschland (PhD thesis, Universität Bern. Publ. Strassburg: Heitz & Co., 1934)

A historical survey and stylistic analysis of German translations of the Sonnets. The introductory chapters discuss the reception of the Sonnets in general, their poetic style and the problem of translating English verse. The author sidelines the eighteenth-century efforts at rewriting Shakespeare’s sonnets into German (e.g. the prose renderings by Eschenburg) and begins his narrative with the “romantische” translations of the early nineteenth century; he goes on to discuss a number of “bürgerliche” translations from later in the century before zooming in on the “aristokratisch-unbürgerliche Antinaturalismus” of Stefan George’s versions. The versions by Karl Kraus are acknowledged bibliographically but were too recent to be discussed. [DD]

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Keller, W., “Shakespeares Eindringen in Frankreich und die deutsche Shakespeare-Begeisterung” in Europäischer Wissenschaftsdienst 2 (1942): 2-3

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Kennan, Patricia and Mariangela Tempera (eds), International Shakespeare: The Tragedies (Bologna: CLUEB, 1996)

The fourteen papers collected here express a common interest in processes of cross-cultural appropriation and share a conviction that Shakespeare Studies would be better off without British blinkers. The papers look into a variety of themes including the challenge posed by the international Shakespeare traditions to the myth of Englishness, the political significance of German Hamlet appropriations, the ideological background of Bulgarian productions of Macbeth, the history of Hamlet in Poland, the theatrical career of Macbeth in Milan and the difficulty of staging Coriolanus in Italy. [DD]

*

Kennedy, Dennis, Looking at Shakespeare: A Visual History of Twentieth-Century Performance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Second edition, 2001)

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Kennedy, Dennis (ed.), Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

This pioneering collection of essays claims attention for modern Shakespearean theatrical productions outside the English language. Translations are mainly viewed from the performance angle. [DD]

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Kennedy, Dennis, “Introduction: Shakespeare without His Language” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 1-18 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

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Kennedy, Dennis, “Shakespeare Worldwide” in The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare. Edited by Margreta de Grazia and Stanley Wells, 251-264 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001)

A few case studies are selected and analysed in such a way as to create a spatio-temporal and a cultural-ideological framework for the worldwide reception of Shakespeare. Ranging translation along with other modes of reception, Kennedy looks into the cases of Germany (which illustrates how nationalist motives played an important part in the eighteenth century), India (illustrating colonial and post-colonial strategies from the nineteenth century onwards) and Japan (where Shakespeare was discovered more recently in the context of an interculturalist agenda). [DD]

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Kerr, Heather, Robin Eaden and Madge Mitton (eds), Shakespeare: World Views (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1996)

The book comprises fifteen papers concerned with the politics of reading and performance in Australasia, Asia and Europe. The attention to the history and politics of Shakespeare in performance is matched by an interest in the uses and inscriptions of Shakespeare from postcolonial and new European locations. The essays deal with ‘translations’ as diverse as Bertolt Brecht’s Hamlet, J.-F. Ducis’ Othello and Peter Greenaway’s Prospero’s Books. [DD]

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Kiernander, Adrian, Ariane Mnouchkine and the Théâtre du Soleil (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

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Kinloch, David, “Questions of Status: Macbeth in Québécois and Scots” in The Translator 8:1 (2002): 73-100

This article compares two translations of Macbeth, one into Québécois by Michel Garneau, the other into Lowland Scots by R.L.C. Lorimer. Recent analysis of these outstanding examples of ‘minority’ translation practice has tended to overlook the critical after-life that has contributed to the classic status of ‘The Scottish Play’. The article asks whether this matters and uses insights first developed by New Historicist critics to revise and nuance Annie Brisset’s powerful critique of the ethnocentrism of the Garneau translation, suggesting that the banished figure of the ‘Foreign’ in fact returns through the material signs of its erasure. R.L.C. Lorimer’s ‘restoration’ of the figure of Mary, Queen of Scots, to the royal line hallucinated by Macbeth works in a similar way, giving rise to the argument that historicizing vernaculars, provided they are used in an ironic, self-conscious manner by translators, can create dramatic texts that speak to and about the complex cultural and linguistic histories and realities of aspiring nation states and the central role played by translation itself in this context. [author’s abstract]

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Kiséry, András, “Hamletizing the Spirit of the Nation: Political Uses of Kazinczy’s 1790 Translation” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 11-35 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

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Klajn, Hugó, “Shakespeare in Yugoslavia” in Shakespeare Quarterly 5 (1954): 41-45

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Kleber, Pia, “Theatrical Continuities in Giorgio Strehler’s The Tempest” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 140-157 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

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Klein, Holger, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol (eds), Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

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Klein, Holger and Jean-Marie Maguin (eds), Shakespeare and France (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1994)

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Klein, Holger and Michele Marrapodi (eds), Shakespeare and Italy (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1999)

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Klein, Holger and Christopher Smith (eds), Hamlet at Home and Abroad. Special issue of New Comparison 2 (1986)

New Comparison was the journal of the British Comparative Literature Association from 1986 until 2003. Its special issue on Hamlet at Home and Abroad is based on a BCLA conference held in Norwich in 1986. Among other features, it offers papers on Hamlet in France (by H. Gaston Hall), Germany (by Manfred Pfister) and Turkey (by Saliha Paker), as well as on Shakespearean influences on Maupassant (Robert Lethbridge) and Chekhov (Harai Golomb). The issue is concluded by thorough review articles on Bate (1986), Carlson (1986) and Müller-Schwefe (1986). [DD]

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Klein, Holger and Christopher Smith (eds) The Opera and Shakespeare (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1994)

Knight, George Wilson, Shakespeare and Tolstoy (London: Oxford University Press, 1934)

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Knox, Israel, The Aesthetic Theories of Kant, Hegel, and Schopenhauer (New York: Columbia University Press, 1936)

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Kob, Sabine, Wielands Shakespeare-Übersetzung: ihre Entstehung und ihre Rezeption im Sturm und Drang. Europäische Hochschulschriften: Angelsächsische Sprache und Literatur 365 (Frankfurt/Main, etc.: Peter Lang, 2000)

Christoph Martin Wieland’s prose translations of Shakespeare – the first comprehensive Shakespearean translation project in German (eight volumes, 1762-1766) – were to be eclipsed by the Schlegel-Tieck versions. This study puts Wieland centre stage and examines more in particular the intricate relations between Wieland’s translation and the Sturm und Drang movement, concluding that there has indeed been influence in several ways. [DD]

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Koberstein, August, Shakespeare allmähliches Bekanntwerden in deutschland und Urteile über ihn bis zum Jahr 1773. Vermischte Aufsätze (Leipzig, 1858)

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Koberstein, August, “Shakespeare in Deutschland” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 1 (1865): 1-17

*

Kocourek, Rostislav, Michael Bishop and Lise Lapierre (eds), Le Shakespeare français: sa langue / The French Shakespeare: His Language. Special issue of Alfa 10/11 (Halifax: Dalhousie University, 1997/1998)

No fewer than twenty-five conference papers are brought together in this volume, addressing various aspects of French (including French-Canadian) Shakespeare translation past and present. Despite the absence of an index and other forms of editorial guidance, this volume should be compulsory reading for all those interested in French translations of the Bard. [DD]

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König, Wilhelm, Jr., “Voltaire und Shakespeare” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 10 (1875): 259-310

*

Korte, Barbara, “Shakespeare under Different Flags: The Bard in German Classrooms from Hitler to Honecker” in Journal of Contemporary History 44:2 (2009): 267-286

This article contributes to the study of Shakespeare’s appropriation in Germany during the twentieth century, with a particular focus on its two authoritarian regimes: the Third Reich and the German Democratic Republic. Germans have had their very own ‘German’ Shakespeare since the eighteenth century. Goethe and Schiller, among others, claimed the playwright for their projects of literary (and national) self-assertion. Ideologues in the Third Reich and the GDR conscripted this already ‘naturalized’ Shakespeare for the purposes of ideological education, and even hailed a new era in the appreciation of his work. Under the swastika, teachers were encouraged to study Shakespeare’s Führerfiguren, as well as his anticipation of the racial concerns of National Socialism. In classrooms of the GDR, the emphasis shifted to Shakespeare’s humanism and realism, from which, students learned, contemporary socialist literature had evolved. The plays were now read as critical and optimistic responses to a social and political reality defined by class struggle. [author’s abstract]

*

Kott, Jan, Shakespeare Our Contemporary. Translated by Bolesław Taborski (Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, 1964)

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Kujawinska-Courtney, Krystyna (ed.), On Page and Stage: Shakespeare in Polish and World Culture (Krakow: Universitas, 2000)


L

Lacroix, Albert, Histoire de l’influence de Shakspeare sur le théâtre français jusqu’à nos jours (Bruxelles: Th. Lesigne, 1856)

This study of Shakespeare’s influence on France is more than a century and a half old; it creates a curious temporal perspective to read that M. Lafond is “actuellement” (i.e. “now”) working on a translation of the Sonnets and that “M. Victor Hugo, fils, prépare une traduction de ses poëmes dramatiques” (p. 346). Yet this study still impresses by its detail and excellent documentation. The author records the struggle between Shakespeare and French rule poetics from the inside rather than with the later historian’s greater critical distance. For all his outspoken admiration for the Bard and the French romantics who campaigned for his acceptance, and despite his conclusion that Shakespeare has a mission to serve as a moral and artistic guide for France and for all humanity, Lacroix can’t help commenting on the “flaws” of Shakespeare in a critical vocabulary still ringing with Voltairean echoes. [DD]

*

Lambert, José, “How Émile Deschamps translated Shakespeare’s Macbeth, or theatre system and translational system in French literature (1800-1850)” in Dispositio 7:19-21 (1982): 53-60

*

Lambert, José, “Shakespeare en France au tournant du XVIIIe siècle: Un dossier européen” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 25-44 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

The author surveys the status of Shakespeare’s influence and reception in France in literary history and comparative literature. He pleads for a more wide-ranging approach to the Shakespearean dossier which does not limit itself to either the literary or the theatrical modes of reception. Even in the 1820s, which saw the breakthrough of Romanticism in France in the field of literature, the Shakespearean versions of a preceding generation continued to hold the scene. This highlights the need for further and more systematic study into the interactions between different fields of Shakespearean reproduction. [DD]

*

Laroque, François,“Shakespeare’s Imaginary Geography” in Shakespeare and Renaissance Europe. Edited by Andrew Hadfield and Paul Hammond, 193-219 (London: Thomson Learning, 2005)

 
Even though the canon is full of allusions to maps, to places and
place-names, the word 'geography' never appears in any of the plays.In
fact, Shakespeare’s European maps take us into the heartland of fantasy. History is always interspersed as fabula and real topography with fantasy. [FL]

*

Larroumet, Gustave, Shakespeare et le théâtre français: Études d’histoire et de critique dramatiques (Paris, 1892)

*

Ledebur, Ruth Freifrau von, Shakespeare in Deutschland seit 1945 (Frankfurt/Main: Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft, 1974)

*

Larson, Kenneth E. and Hansjoerg R. Schelle (eds), The Reception of Shakespeare in Eighteenth-Century France and Germany. Special issue of Michigan Germanic Studies 15:2 (Ann Arbor, MI: Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Michigan, 1989)

This slim volume offers a well-documented and level-headed scholarly discussion of early translations and criticism in the two nations which led continental Europe in the discovery and appreciation of Shakespeare. Kenneth Larson’s two contributions are particularly worthwhile. [DD]

*

Ledbury, Mark, “Visions of Tragedy: Jean-Francois Ducis and Jacques-Louis David” in Eighteenth-Century Studies 37:4 (2004): 553-580

This article explores the relationship between Jean-François Ducis and Jacques-Louis David, on the basis of unpublished manuscript material and in the context of the use, limits and possibilities of the tragic in the later decades of the eighteenth century in France. It argues that two projects, Ducis’s Macbeth and David’s Caracalla ideas, both taking shape from 1781-­83, might usefully be compared in the context of Ducis’s increasing interest in dramatic pictorialism, and David’s fascination with, and use of, models and rhetoric derived from the tragic stage. [author’s abstract]

*

Leek, Robert-Henri, Shakespeare in the Netherlands: A Study of Dutch Translations and Dutch Performances of William Shakespeare’s Plays. 2 vols (PhD thesis, University of Auckland, New Zealand, 1972)

*

Leek, Robert-Henri, Shakespeare in Nederland: Kroniek van vier eeuwen Shakespeare in Nederlandse vertalingen en op het Nederlands toneel (Zutphen: Walburg Pers, 1988)

This Dutch book is a revised, updated and nicely illustrated version of the author’s 1972 PhD thesis. It is a comprehensive and well documented survey of Shakespeare’s translations and theatrical career in the Netherlands Countries from the seventeenth-century beginnings all the way into the 1980s. The author’s stance is that of the evaluative critic. [DD]

*

Leek, Robert-Henri, “‘Bless Thee, Bottom, Bless Thee! Thou Art Translated!’: The Bard and His Dutch Interpreters” in Something Understood: Studies in Anglo-Dutch Literary Translation. Edited by Bart Westerweel and Theo D’haen, 139-70. (Amsterdam and Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 1990)

A brief but insightful summary of nearly four centuries of Shakespeare reception and translation in the Low Countries, beginning with the visits of the strolling players during Shakespeare’s lifetime and going as far as the versions by Decorte, Komrij and Claus in the 1980s. [DD]

*

Leeuwe, H. H. J. de, “Shakespeare op het Nederlandse toneel” in De Gids 127 (1964): 324-339

A survey of Shakespeare’s stage history in Holland, starting with the strolling players and subsequently discussing to the performances of the Ducis versions, the search for a more ‘authentic’ Shakespeare in the second half of the nineteenth-century, and the various creative or even experimental versions of the twentieth century. [DD]

*

Leiter, Samuel L., Shakespeare around the Globe: A Guide to Notable Postwar Revivals (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1986)

*

Leithner-Brauns, Annette, “Shakespeares Sonette in deutschen Übersetzungen 1787-1994: Eine bibliographische Übersicht” in Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen 232:2 (1995): 285-316

*

Levaillant, M., “Quand Shakespeare à Jersey parle à Victor Hugo” in Revue de Littérature Comparée 26 (1952): 296-312

*

Levin, Yuri D., “Shakespeare and Russian Literature: Nineteenth-Century Attitudes” in Oxford Slavonic Papers n.s. 22 (1989): 115-132

*

Levin, Yuri D., “Russian Shakespeare Translations in the Romantic Era” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 75-90 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

Early Russian translations were typically based on French intermediary versions (P.A. de La Place, J.F. Ducis), but from the 1820s the need for more faithful Shakespeare translations was felt more and more keenly, especially in romantic literary circles. The essay zooms in on the Shakespearean achievements of romantic translators such as Mikhail Vronchenko, Wilhem Kyukhelbeker and Vasily Yakimov. Their translations were scholarly versions, however, deemed unsuitable for the stage which continued to be dominated by Ducis-based neoclassical versions. The Hamlet of Nikolay Polevoy (1837) proved to be a turning point. [DD]

*

LeWinter, Oswald (ed.), Shakespeare in Europe (1963. Rpt. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1970)

A well-known anthology, which brings together in English translation long extracts of Continental Shakespeare criticism, with French (from Voltaire to Jean-Louis Barrault) and German selections (from Gotthold Ephraim Lessing to Hugo von Hofmannsthal) dominating the field. The editor’s emphasis on canonized culture, coupled with a neglect of ‘minor’ European cultures, and his belief in the relative autonomy of the aesthetic response would be hardly convincing today. In neither the editorial matter nor the selections much importance is attributed to translation. [DD]

*

Lieblein, Leanore, “Translation and mise en scène: The Example of Contemporary French Shakespeare” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 76-92 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

Limon, Jerzy, Gentlemen of a Company: English Players in Central and Eastern Europe, 1590-1660 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985)

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Limon, Jerzy and Jay L. Halio (eds), Shakespeare and His Contemporaries: Eastern and Central European Studies (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1993)

*

Lirondelle, André, Shakespeare en Russie (1748-1840). Étude de littérature comparée (Paris: Librairie Hachette, 1912)

*

Locatelli, Angela, L’eloquenza e gli incantesimi. Interpretazioni Shakespeariane (Milano: A. Guerini, 1988)

*

Locatelli, Angela, “Shakespeare in Italian Romanticism: Literary Querelles, translations and interpretations” in Shakespeare and Italy. Edited by Holger Klein and Michele Marrapodi, 19-37 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1999)

*

Loehlin, James N., “‘Wish Not a Man From England’: Henry V Outside the United Kingdom” in his Henry V. Shakespeare in Performance Series, 146-169 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1996)

*

Lombardo, Agostino, “Shakespeare and Italian Criticism” in The Disciplines of Criticism. Essays in Literary Theory, Interpretation and History. Edited by Peter Demetz, Thomas Greene and Lowry Nelson jr, 531-580 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1968)

*

Loomba, Ania and Martin Orkin (eds), Post-Colonial Shakespeares (London and New York: Routledge, 1998)

In an effort to bring about a rapprochement between Shakespeare Studies and Post-colonial Studies, the fourteen essays in this collection discuss issues of race and nationhood, showing the emergence of colonial practices and discourses in early modern Britain, the appropriations of Shakespeare within both colonial strategies and strategies of resistance, and the Bard’s positions in the so-called post-colonial world of today. Most essays show a strong theoretical commitment to Gender Studies. [DD]

*

Lotheissen, Ferdinand, “Shakespeare in Frankreich” in his Literatur und Gesellschaft in Frankreich zur Zeit der Revolution (Weimar, 1872)

*

Lounsbury, T.R. (Thomas Raynesford), Shakespeare and Voltaire (1902. Rpt. New York: Benjamin Blom, 1968)

*

Luther, A., “Shakespeare in Rußland” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 84-86 (1950): 214-228

*

Lynch, Jack, Becoming Shakespeare. How a dead poet became the world’s foremost literary genius (London: Constable, 2007)

The author tells the story of Shakespeare’s rise to global fame. A readable account for the general reader. Despite the global dimension hinted at in the book’s title, it hardly pays attention to what happens beyond Britain. [DD]


M

Maanen, W. van, “Hamlet in Frankrijk” in De Gids 127:5 (1965): 384-397

A discussion of different translations of the play and representations of the character in France, starting with Voltaire and Ducis and ending with Bonnefoy. The author considers the difficulty inherent in making Shakespeare come to life in the French language and culture. [DD]

*

Magon, Leopold, “Deutschland, Shakespeare und der Norden” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 82/83 (1948): 136-153

*

Maguin, Jean-Marie, “Shakespeare Studies in France since 1960” in Shakespeare and France. Edited by Holger Klein and Jean-Marie Maguin, 359-373 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1994)

*

Makaryk, Irena R., Shakespeare in the Undiscovered Bourn (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004)

Includes material on Shakespeare in early Soviet Ukraine, with a special focus on Macbeth and Othello. [IM]

*

Makaryk, Irena R., “Woman Scorned: Antony and Cleopatra at Moscow’s Vakhtangov Theatre” in Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 178-194 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

*

Makaryk, Irena R., and Marissa McHugh, eds., Shakespeare and the Second World War:  Memory, Culture, Identity (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012).

*

Makaryk, Irena R., and Joseph G. Price, eds., Shakespeare in the Worlds of Communism and Socialism (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006).

Includes material on Shakespeare in Latvia, Russia, Ukraine, Germany, Czech Republic, Poland, and Hungary. [IM]

*

Maley, Willy, “‘This Sceptred Isle’: Shakespeare and the British Problem” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 83-108 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

*

Maller, Sándor, and Kálmán Ruttkay (eds), Magyar Shakespeare tükör [Hungarian Shakespeare Mirror] (Budapest: Gondolat, 1984)

*

Mallet, Nicole, “Hugo, père et fils, Shakespeare et la traduction” in TTR: traduction, terminologie, rédaction 6:1 (1993): 113-130

*

*

Marder, Louis, His Exits and Entrances: The Story of Shakespeare’s Reputation (London: John Murray, 1963)

An interesting survey of the growth of Shakespeare’s reputation despite its almost exclusive focus on the English-speaking world. The ‘rest’ of the world is covered in the final chapter “All the World’s a Stage” (pp. 328-326). [DD]

*

Marín Calvarro, Jesùs Ángel, “El entramado dilógico del discurso poético de William Shakespeare y su adaptación al español” in Hermeneus 9 (2007): 163-178

A discussion of Shakespeare’s wordplay – traditionally regarded as a major obstacle to translation. The author identifies and explains the wordplay in sonnet 2 and assesses how different leading Spanish translators have coped with it. [DD]

*

Mark, Thomas Raymond, Shakespeare in Hungary: A History of the Translation, Presentation, and Reception of Shakespeare’s Dramas in Hungary, 1785-1878 (PhD thesis, Columbia University, New York, 1955)

*

Márkus, Zoltán, “‘Loyalty to Shakespeare’: The Cultural Context of the 1952 Hamlet-Production of the Hungarian National Theater” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 169-189 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Marrapodi, Michele, A. J. Hoenselaars, Marcello Cappuzzo and Lino F. Santucci (eds), Shakespeare’s Italy: Functions of Italian Locations in Renaissance Drama (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1993. Revised edition: Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

*

Marrapodi, Michele and A. J. Hoenselaars (eds), The Italian World of English Renaissance Drama: Cultural Exchange and Intertextuality (Newark: Delaware University Press, 1998)

*

Martins, Marcia A. P., A instrumentalidade dos estudos descritivos para a análise de traduções: o caso dos Hamlets brasileiros (PhD thesis, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Sao Paulo, 1999)

*

Massai, Sonia (ed.), World-wide Shakespeares. Local appropriations in film and performance (London and New York: Routledge, 2005)

This book examines the ways in which adapters and directors have put Shakespeare into dialogue with local traditions and contexts: how have ‘local’ Shakespeares worked for various local, national and/or international audiences? The essays cover a range of English and foreign appropriations that challenge geographical and cultural oppositions between ‘centre’ and ‘periphery’ and between ‘big-time’ and ‘small-time’ Shakespeares. Several case studies have particularly European resonances, dealing as they do with Dürren­matt’s Titus Andronicus, Pasolini’s Othello, post-war German performances of The Merchant of Venice, film versions of Henry V, etc. [DD]

*

Matei-Chesnoiu, Monica, Shakespeare in the Romanian Cultural Memory. With a Foreword by Arthur F. Kinney (Madison, Teaneck: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2006)

*

Matei-Chesnoiu, Monica (ed.), Shakespeare in Nineteenth-Century Romania. With a foreword by Ton Hoenselaars (Bucharest: Humanitas, 2006)

A collection of essays on the emergence of a Shakespearean culture in Romania as a cultural model and an inaugurator of modernity. Several translated and illustrated editions are discussed, as various forms of literary influence. Much attention is given to linguistic issues involved in translation, but also to cultural and political contexts that conditioned them. The editor provides a bibliography of translations and critical studies. [DD]

*

Matei-Chesnoiu, Monica (ed.), Shakespeare in Romania 1900-1950. With a foreword by Stanley Wells (Bucharest: Humanitas, 2007)

This carefully edited collection has the same format as its companion volume Matei-Chesnoiu (2006). In the period covered by this book Shakespeare begins to play a larger part in the theatres. In addition to translations and performance history, the essays deal with literary, artistic and critical responses. Politics is always around the corner; Shakespeare often had a therapeutic function in a traumatized nation. The biblio­graphical material is an important feature of this volume. [DD]

*

Mateo Martínez-Bartolomé, Marta, La traducción del humor: las comedias inglesas en español (Oviedo: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Oviedo, 1995)

Combining insights from Descriptive Translation Studies, pragmatics and humour studies, the book investigates the specific problems involved in translating comedies. Two twentieth-century translations of Much Ado About Nothing are discussed (besides plays by Ben Jonson, William Wycherly, R. B. Sheridan, Oscar Wilde and Noël Coward). [DD]

*

Mathijssen, Jan Willem, The Breach and the Observance. Theatre retranslation as a strategy of artistic differentiation, with special reference to retranslations of Shakespeare’s Hamlet (1777-2001) (Utrecht: s.l., 2007. Freely downloadable as a PDF-file from http://www.dehamlet.nl/)

Mathijssen’s book – his Utrecht PhD thesis, defended in 2007 – tries to find out why Hamlet has been retranslated for the Dutch theatre so many times between 1777 (when the first Dutch Hamlet was performed in The Hague and Rotterdam) and 2001 (no fewer than six versions and adaptations performed in Holland alone). The author deals with retranslation in and for the theatre specifically: the translator is networked interactively with other social agents who are involved in the theatrical process such as the director (often the commissioner of the translation), other members of the production crew, the dramaturge and even the audience and the critics. [DD]

*

McClure, Derrick, “When Macbeth Becomes Scots” in Ilha do desterro: A Journal of English Language, Literatures in English, and Cultural Studies (Brazil), 36 (1999): 29-51

*

McManaway, James G. (ed.), Shakespeare and England. Review of national literatures 3:2 (Jamaica, NY: St. John’s University, 1972)

*

Meissner, J., Die englischen Komödianten zur Zeit Shakespeares in Österreich (Vienna, 1884)

*

Melchiori, Giorgio, “Translating Shakespeare: an Italian View” in Shakespeare Translation 5 (1978): 19-30

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Michelucci, Pascal, “Shakespeare traduit devant le tribunal du goût: Macbeth et Othello (1746-1829)” in Alfa 10/11 (1997/1998): 75-88

*

Moltzer, H. E., Shakespeare’s invloed op het nederlandsch tooneel der zeventiende eeuw (Groningen, 1874)

*

Monaco, Marion, Shakespeare on the French Stage in the Eighteenth Century. Études de littérature étrangère et comparée 70 (Paris: Didier, 1974)

This important book provides a detailed discussion of French stage adaptations from the siècle des lumières, illustrating the wide gap that existed between the published translations (which were showing increasing levels of philological rigour: e.g. Pierre Le Tourneur) and the versions intended for the stage (which entailed far-reaching modes of adaptation: e.g. J.-F. Ducis). The focus is on the latter. Nearly thirty adaptations are discussed; they are divided into three chapters, covering the early adaptations (1733-1769), the prerevolutionary period (1769-1787) and the decade of the French Revolution (1789-1800). [DD]

*

Moninger, Markus, Shakespeare inszeniert: Das westdeutsche Regietheater und die Theatertradition ‘des dritten deutschen Klassikers’ (Tübingen: Max Niemeyer, 1996)

*

Mooneeram, Roshni, From Creole to Standard. Shakespeare, language, and literature in a postcolonial context. Cross/Cultures 107 (Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, 2009)

This sociolinguistically inspired study describes the history of the national – creole – language of Mauritius and the process of standardization that it is undergoing in postcolonial times. It focuses on the work of Dev Virahsawmy, who, particularly through his Shakespeare translations, has been an active agent in this process of standardization. [based on the author’s abstract]

*

Morozov, Michael M., Shakespeare on the Soviet Stage. Translated by David Magarshack (London: Soviet News Publications, 1947)

*

Morse, Ruth, “Going Out of My Dialect” in PMLA 118:1 (2003): 126-130

Reflections of an Anglo-American teaching English literature in Paris and (re)discovering Shakespeare in French translation. Things are lost in translation and others are not, and in still other ways Shakespeare is enriched in the defamiliarising experience of watching or reading the plays in a bilingual mode. [DD]

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Morse, Ruth, “Reflections in Shakespeare Translation” in Yearbook of English Studies 36:1 (2006): 79-89

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Morse, Ruth, “The Age of Exploration: Pierre-Antoine de La Place (1707-93) as Shakespeare-archaeologist” in Shakespeare im 18. Jahrhundert. Edited by Roger Paulin, 215-231 (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2007)

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Moutaftchief, I., “Shakespeare and Bulgaria” in Times Literary Supplement, 18 November 1949: 751

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Moyal, Gabriel Louis, “Traduire l’Angleterre sous la restauration: Gibbon et Shakespeare de Guizot” in Meta 50:3 (2005): 881-905

A discussion of François Guizot’s translations of Shakespeare’s complete works and Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, whose importance has been overshadowed by Guizot’s (1787-1874) immense reputation as a historian, politician and political theorist. [DD]

*

Müller-Schwefe, Gerhard, Corpus Hamleticum: Shakespeares Hamlet im Wandel der Medien (Tübingen: Francke, 1987)

A semiotically inspired study which considers the extraordinary range of cross-genre and/or cross-media ‘translations’ that Hamlet has given rise to, including ballet, film, opera, parody, performance and so on. Traditional interlingual translations are touched on occasionally. [DD]

*

Multicultural Shakespeare (Lodz, Poland: Lodz University Press, 2003-)

An international journal devoted to Shakespearean studies; it is a forum in which researchers, especially those from non-English-speaking backgrounds, can air local concerns and themes that contribute to the creation and understanding of Shakespeare as global phenomenon. Multicultural Shakespeare appeared for the first time in 1972 as Shakespeare Translation (Japan). Since then it has undergone various changes: in 1986 it became Shakespeare Worldwide: Translation and Adaptation and in 2003, took on its present title. [based on homepage]

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Muñoz Calvo, Micaela, “Los Sonetos de Shakespeare: Traductores y traducciones españolas” in Miscelánea 8 (1987): 87-99

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Muñoz Calvo, Micaela, Ediciones y traducciones españolas de los sonetos de William Shakespeare: Análisis y valoración crítica (PhD thesis, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1987)


N

Nels, S., “Shakespeare and European Culture” in The Theater (USSR), 4 (1941): 3-15

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Nicoll, Josephine, Shakespeare in Poland (London: Oxford University Press, 1923)

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Nulli, Siro Attilio, Shakespeare in Italia (Milan: Editore della Real Casa, 1918)

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Nüssel, Heide, Rekonstruktion der Shakespeare-Bühne auf dem deutschen Theater (PhD thesis, University of Cologne, 1967)


O

Oechelhäuser, Wilhelm, “Die Würdigung Shakespeares in England und Deutschland” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 20 (1885): 54-68

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Oehlmann, Wilhelm, “Shakespeares Wert für unsere nationale Literatur” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 5 (1870): 148-153

*

Orlovskaya, N. K., “Shakespeare in Georgia,” in Vilyam Shekspir, 1564-1964 (Moscow: Nauka, 1964)

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Országh, Lászlo, “Quoting Shakespeare in Hungary” in New Hungarian Quarterly 5:13 (1964): 90-94

*

O’Shea, José Roberto (ed.), Accents Now Known: Shakespeare’s Drama in Translation. Special issue of Ilha do desterro: A Journal of English Language, Literatures in English and Cultural Studies (Brazil), 36 (1999)

For non-Brazilian readers this volume may be difficult to obtain, but it generously repays the effort. It combines survey papers as well as more specific case studies, being rather unique in the impressive range of target cultures it manages to span: Scotland, Holland, France, Spain, Finland, Russia, Quebec, Brazil, South Africa and Japan. Most papers come with an excellent bibliography. [DD]

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O’Shea, José Roberto and Daniela Lapoli Guimarães (eds), Mixed with Other Matter: Shakespeare’s Drama Appropriated. Special issue of Ilha do desterro: A Journal of English Language, Literatures in English and Cultural Studies (Brazil), 49 (2005)

As a kind of follow-up to O’Shea (1999), this volume offers a generous collection of case studies several of which have a European dimension. Topics include: the translation of Shakespeare’s sexual puns in to Spanish; the rendering of Henry V’s multilingualism in Portuguese; novelistic adaptations of The Tempest; Pirandello’s Enrico IV; Disney’s Lion King; Shakespearean burlesques; the politics of Bulgarian rewritings; and many more. [DD]

*

Ostrovsky, Arkady, “Twelfth Night of 1917 and the Moscow Art Theatre” in Ilha do desterro: A Journal of English Language, Literatures in English, and Cultural Studies (Brazil), 36 (1999): 161-184


P

Pancheva, Evgenia, “Nothings, Merchants, Tempests: Trimming Shakespeare for the 1992 Bulgarian Stage” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 247-260 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Par, Alfonso, Representaciones shakespearianas en España. 2 vols (Madrid and Barcelona: Victoriano Suárez/Biblioteca Balmes, 1936-1940)

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Par, Alfonso, Shakespeare en la literatura española. 2 vols (Madrid and Barcelona: Biblioteca Balmes, 1935)

*

Parker, R. B., “Dramaturgy in Shakespeare and Brecht” in University of Toronto Quarterly 32 (1963): 229-246

*

Pascal, Roy, Shakespeare in Germany, 1740-1815 (1937. Rpt. Folcroft, PA: Folcroft Library Editions, 1973)

*

Paul, Fritz and Brigitte Schultze (eds), Probleme der Dramenübersetzung 1960-1988: Eine Bibliographie (Tübingen: Gunter Narr, 1991)

An indexed listing of recent scholarly studies into drama translation. Offering no annotations and operating within much narrower constraints (translation-related and recent scholarly work only), this bibliography is much slimmer and less ambitious than that of Blinn (see above), but it casts its net wider in other respects. Dealing with drama translation generally, it does not confine itself to Shakespeare. It also covers research done on Shakespeare translations into a variety of target languages other than German. [DD]

*

Paulin, Roger, The Critical Reception of Shakespeare in Germany, 1682-1914. Native Literature and Foreign Genius. (Hildesheim, etc.: Olms Verlag, 2003)

This study is about the fascinating topic of “German Shakespeare”. More precisely, it is an innovative and highly detailed survey of Shakespeare’s critical reception in Germany, from 1682, when the Bard was first mentioned by name — as Sasper — by a German critic, until World War I. Translations of his works into German are discussed too, the focus is mainly on Hamlet and Coriolanus. In the preface, Roger Paulin writes: “My account does not represent one straight path marked with beacon-like names like Lessing or Goethe or Schlegel” (p. 4). Indeed, a major strength of this book lies in the fact that it questions received opinions, such as the idea that the German canonization of the Bard began with Lessing. [MEM]

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Paulin, Roger (ed.), Shakespeare im 18. Jahrhundert (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2007)

A collection of papers which studies the influence of Shakespeare on European national literatures in the eighteenth century as well as on music and the visual arts. The main focus is on England, France and Germany. [DD]

*

Pavis, Patrice, “Wilson, Brook, Zadek: An Intercultural Encounter?” In Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Edited by Dennis Kennedy, 270-289 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

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Pellissier, G., “Le Drame shakespearien en France” in his Essais de littérature contemporaine, 69-109 (Paris, 1893)

*

Pemble, John, Shakespeare Goes to Paris. How the Bard Conquered France (London and New York: Hambledon and London, 2005)

A reader-friendly survey of the process of Shakespeare’s conquest of France, which the author describes as “a cardinal event in the secular traffic of European culture”. The narrative begins in the early eighteenth century and ends in the recent past; besides Shakespeare himself, Voltaire is its main character. [DD]

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Pennink, Renetta, Nederland en Shakespeare: Achttiende eeuw en vroege Romantiek (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1936)

The first PhD in the Low Countries on the reception of Shakespeare. The author focuses on the eighteenth century and on the early romantic period. [DD]

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Petersohn, Roland, Heiner Müllers Shakespeare-Rezeption. Texte und Kontexte (Frankfurt/Main: Peter Lang, 1993)

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Petrone Fresco, Gaby, “An Unpublished Pre-Romantic Hamlet in Eighteenth-Century Italy” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 111-128 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

The paper presents a case study on Alessandro Verri’s Hamlet from 1777, the first Italian translation of the play and the only one until 1814. It comes in three different versions, which have remained unpublished and unperformed. It was through his own creative work that Verri could inject a few Shakespearean elements into what would later be recognized as Italian pre-romanticism. [DD]

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Petrone Fresco, Gaby, Shakespeare’s Reception in Eighteenth-Century Italy: The Case of Hamlet (Bern: Peter Lang: 1993)

The reception of Hamlet is discussed as a representative case of Shakespeare’s appreciation in eighteenth-century Italy. While part I sketches the general context, with anglomania budding despite the dominance of neoclassical poetics, part II homes in on Hamlet and reviews the panorama of critical opinions (including Antonio Conti, Augustus Ralli, Voltaire, Giuseppe Baretti), and part III considers the translations of the play, giving special attention to Alessandro Verri’s unpublished Hamlet. [DD]

*

Pfister, Manfred, “Hamlet und der deutsche Geist: Die Geschichte einer politischen Interpretation” in Deutsche Shakespeare Gesellschaft West, Jahrbuch 1992 (Bochum: Kamp, 1992): 13-38

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Pfister, Manfred, “Hamlets Made in Germany, East and West” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 76-91 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Pfister, Pfister and Jürgen Gutsch (eds), Shakespeare’s Sonnets For the First Time Globally Reprinted. A Quartercentenary Anthology 1609-2009 (Dozwil TG Schweiz: Edition SIGNAThUR, 2009)

An anthology of hundreds of translations and versions of the Sonnets in more than seventy languages and dialects. The book is subdivided into seventy-three alphabetically arranged “contributions”, each dealing with a particular area or target language and being prefaced by an informative headnote which sets the translations in their literary and historical contexts. Contributions cover Afrikaans, Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Armenian translations and so on further down the alphabetical list ending with sections on Turkish, Ukrainian, Yiddish and Visual Translations. The anthology covers a range of dialects and minority languages (Cimbrian, Pennsylvania German, West Frisian...) as well as major target languages; in addition to “Visual Languages” the less conventional forms of “translation” include “German Parodies” and “Sign Languages”. Of special interest are the sections on the Shakespeare sonnets in Esperanto, Latin and Klingon. The book is accompanied by a data-disc with audio recordings, among many other features. [DD]

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Pokorný, Jaroslav, Shakespeare in Czechoslovakia (Prague: Orbis, 1955)

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Popović, Vladeta, Shakespeare in Serbia (London: Oxford University Press, 1928)

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Popović, Vladeta, “Shakespeare among the South Slavs, especially in Post-War Yugoslavia” in Zbornik Filozofskog Fakulteta (Belgrade) 2 (1952): 281-291

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Portillo, Rafael and Manuel J. Gómez-Lara, “Shakespeare in the New Spain: Or, What you Will” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 208-228 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Potter, Nicholas, “‘Like to a Tenement or a Pelting Farm’ – Richard II and the Idea of the Nation” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 130-147 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Praz, Mario, Caleidoscopio shakespeariano (Bari: Adriatica, 1969)

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Price, Lawrence M., “Shakespeare as Pictured by Voltaire, Goethe, and Oeser” in Germanic Review 25 (1950): 83-84

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Pruvost, René, “Traductions récentes de Shakespeare” in Études anglaises 13:2 (1960): 132-140

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Pujals, Esteban, “On Translating Shakespeare into Spanish” in Shakespeare Translation 2 (1975): 16-29

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Pujante, Ángel-Luis, “Traducir el teatro isabelino, especialmente Shakespeare” in Cuadernos de teatro clásico 4 (1989): 135-157

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Pujante, Ángel-Luis, “Shakespeare en traducción: problemas textuales del original” in Shakespeare en España. Crítica, traducciones y representaciones. Edited by José Manuel González, 227-252 (Alicante: Universidad de Alicante; Zaragoza: Libros Pórtico, 1993)

*

Pujante, Ángel-Luis, “Traducir Shakespeare: mis tres fidelidades” in Vasos Comunicantes 5 (Autumn, 1995): 11-21

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Pujante, Ángel-Luis, “Spanish and European Shakespeares: Some Considerations” in Folio 6:2 (1999): 18-38

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Pujante, Ángel-Luis, “Translating Shakespeare’s Songs: the Letter and the Musical Spirit” in Pathways of Translation Studies. Edited by Purificación Fernández and José Mª Bravo, 205-216 (Valladolid: Universidad de Valladolid, 2001)

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Pujante, Ángel Luis and Ton Hoenselaars (eds), 400 Years of Shakespeare in Europe. With a foreword by Stanley Wells (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2003)

A record of the proceedings of the 1999 Murcia conference on ‘Four Centuries of Shakespeare in Europe’. Two wide-ranging introductory papers are followed by thirteen further contributions subdivided into three sections: appropriations; translations; productions. The book comes with a comprehensive bibliography on “Shakespeare in European Culture” which is incorporated into the present list. See also Gregor & Pujante (above). [DD]

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Pujante, Ángel-Luis, “Shakespeare: textos, ediciones, medios” in Manual de documentación para la traducción literaria. Edited by Valentín García Yebra and Consuelo Gonzalo García, 297-312 (Madrid: Arco Libros, 2005)

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Pujante, Ángel-Luis and Keith Gregor, “Conservatism and Liberalism in the Four Spanish Renderings of Ducis’ Hamlet” in Shakespeare and European Politics. With a foreword by Ton Hoenselaars. Edited by Dirk Delabastita, Jozef De Vos and Paul Franssen, 304-317 (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2008)

The authors summarize the fortunes of Ducis’ Hamlet (1769) all over Europe before concentrating on the Spanish versions of the French play. There are no fewer than four of them performed or written between 1772 and 1825. They all introduce textual and ideological manipulations in an adaptation that had already taken enormous liberties with the Shakespearean original. A close reading of lexical modulations in the four versions reveal the effect of their authors’ political convictions, which seem to have varied between a conservative defence of ancient regime values and radical liberalism. [DD]

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Pujante, Ángel-Luis, “Shakespeare’s Sonnets in Spanish: Rescuing the Early Verse Translations” in 1611. Revista de Historia de la traducción 3 (2009): http://www.traduccionliteraria.org/1611/art/pujante.htm

In 1889 Matías de Velasco y Rojas, who had translated Shakespearean sonnets in prose, published what appears to be the first rendering in Spanish of a Shakespearean sonnet in sonnet form. Further verse translations of Shakespeare’s sonnets followed for over thirty years. However, the early translators into Spanish did not focus their efforts on translating the complete cycle or a majority of the sonnets. Instead, their poetic versions were published in literary journals and collections of foreign poetry in Spain and Latin America, thus complicating the task of documenting them. This article sets out to provide evidence of new early verse translations of Shakespearean sonnets into Spanish that have never been listed in the relevant bibliographies and discuss their first publication, the translators, their characteristics and importance, as well as to add some new facts to the extant information. [author’s abstract]

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Pujol, Dídac, Traduir Shakespeare. Les reflexions dels traductors catalans. Quaderns 3 (Lleida: Punctum & Trilcat, 2007)

The author gives an introductory chapter on the reception of Shakespeare in Europe (England, France, Germany) and on the history of Catalan translations of Shakespeare, before presenting sixteen fully annotated prefaces and essays by Catalan translators, in which they reflect on the task of rendering Shakespeare’s plays and poems into their language. This anthology begins in the late nineteenth century when the Catalan Shakespeare tradition emerged and goes as far as 2004. It is completed by a detailed bibliography of translations and secondary texts. [DD]

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Paulin, Roger, The Critical Reception of Shakespeare in Germany, 1682-1914. Native Literature and Foreign Genius. (Hildesheim, etc.: Olms Verlag, 2003)

This study is about the fascinating topic of “German Shakespeare”. More precisely, it is an innovative and highly detailed survey of Shakespeare’s critical reception in Germany, from 1682, when the Bard was first mentioned by name — as Sasper — by a German critic, until World War I. Translations of his works into German are discussed too, the focus is mainly on Hamlet and Coriolanus. In the preface, Roger Paulin writes: “My account does not represent one straight path marked with beacon-like names like Lessing or Goethe or Schlegel” (p. 4). Indeed, a major strength of this book lies in the fact that it questions received opinions, such as the idea that the German canonization of the Bard began with Lessing. [MEM]


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Rădulescu, I. Horia, “Les Intermédiares français de Shakespeare en Roumanie” in Revue de Littérature Comparée 18 (1938): 252-271

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Raleigh, Walter Alexander, Shakespeare and England (London: Oxford University Press, 1918)

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Ranke, Wolfgang, “Shakespeare Translations for Eighteenth-Century Stage Productions in Germany: Different Versions of Macbeth” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 163-182 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

A historically contextualized discussion of three German versions of Macbeth from the late eighteenth century: H.L. Wagner’s (1779), G.A. Bürger’s (1783) and Fr. Schiller’s (1800). These are compared from the viewpoint of the play’s three levels of significance: the moral level of individual guilt and penance; the political level of tyranny and the restoration of order; and the metaphysical level of the natural order being disrupted. Each of the three Macbeth versions was inspired by a different set of textual models and positions itself differently in the changing landscape of the German theatre. [DD]

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Raszewski, Zbigniew, “Against some Part of Poland” in Drama (Spring, 1936): 24-28

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Riedel, W., “Über Shakespeares Würdigung in England, Frankreich und Deutschland” in Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen 48 (1882)

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Robertson, J.G., “The Knowledge of Shakespeare on the Continent at the Beginning of the Eighteenth Century” in Modern Language Review 1 (1905/1906): 312-321

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Robertson, J.G., “Shakespeare on the Continent” in Cambridge History of English Literature 5, 283-308 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1910)

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Roesler, Stéphanie, “Au-delà des figures, les êtres: Shakespeare et Yeats traduits par Yves Bonnefoy” in TTR: traduction, terminologie, rédaction 19:1 (2006): 97-121

Yves Bonnefoy is one of France’s most celebrated Shakespeare translators. This article discusses his conception of translation as a human experience and an empathic dialogue between the translator and the author of the original text. Through an analysis of Bonnefoy’s translations of Shakespeare and Yeats, it identifies what is at stake in such a dialogue. While trying to make Shakespeare’s or Yeats’ voice audible in the translation, Bonnefoy also searches for his own voice. Translation, as a continual artistic creation, is what enables the figure of the translator-poet to reveal itself. [based on author’s abstract]

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Rauch, Herman, Lenz und Shakespeare: Ein Beitrag zur Shakespearomanie der Sturm- und Drangperiode (PhD thesis, Freiburg, 1892)

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Reymond, William, Corneille, Shakespeare et Goethe: Étude sur l’influence anglo-germanique en France au XIXe siècle (Paris: Klincksieck, 1864)

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Rhodes, Neil, “Bridegrooms to the Goddess: Hughes, Heaney and the Elizabethans” in Shakespeare and Ireland: History, Politics, Culture. Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray, 152-172 (Houndmills: Macmillan, 1997)

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Roger, Christine (ed.), Shakespeare vu d’Allemagne et de France des Lumières au Romantisme (Paris: CNRS Editions, 2007)

This volume brings together thirteen papers delivered at a conference organised by Christine Roger at the University of Amiens in April 2006. It focuses on a key period in the European reception of Shakespeare, when the first complete translations start appearing and Shakespeare finds his way to the stages of France and Germany. The papers look at different dimensions of this process: the translations and adaptations, criticism and debate, and the complex influence on local esthetic norms and practices. [DD]

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Roger, Christine, La Réception de Shakespeare en Allemagne de 1815 à 1850. Propagation et assimilation de la référence étrangère (Bern, etc.: Peter Lang, 2008)

A lengthy monograph which takes a close look at the reception of Shakespeare in Germany in the so-called “Vormärz” (pre-March era), i.e. the decades leading up the failed March 1848 revolution. Between 1815 and 1850 debates continue about the conditions which are necessary for a national German theatre to take shape and about the role a German Shakespeare can play in this process. The cultural transfer of Shakespeare turns out to comprise a surprising range of manifestations: editions, translations, journals, almanacs, anthologies, iconographic documents, critical essays and books… The study considers how Shakespeare was absorbed into mainstream culture. [DD]

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Rose, Francis, “Les Poètes élisabéthains et nous” in Le Théâtre Elizabéthain, 311-313 (Paris: Les Cahiers du Sud, 1940)

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Rothe, Hans, “Shakespeare in französischem und deutschen Gewande bei Polen, Russen und Tschechen” in Das Shakespeare-Bild in Europa zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik. Edited by Roger Bauer, 262-282 (Bern: Peter Lang, 1988)

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Rousseau, André-Michel, “Métamorphose ou anamorphose: les visages successifs de Shakespeare en France” in Canadian Review of Comparative Literature 7 (1980): 213-222

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Rowe, Eleanor, Hamlet: A Window on Russia (New York: New York University Press, 1976)

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Rudenti, Lucio (ed.), Shakespeare degli Italiani: I testi scespiiriani inspirati da fatti e figure della nostra storia e delle nostra leggenda (Turin: Società Editrice Torinese, 1950)

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Ruppert y Ujaravi, Ricardo, Shakespeare en España. Traducciones, imitaciones e influencia de las obras de Shakespeare en la literatura española (Madrid: Tip. de la “Rev. de Arch., Bibl. y Museos,” 1920)


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Saint-Denis, Michel, “Shakespeare en France et en Angleterre” in Revue théâtrale 26 (1954): 13-18

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Salingar, L. G., “The Soviet Public and Shakespeare” in Anglo-Soviet Journal 3 (1942): 228-234

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Samarin, Roman Mikhailovich and Alexander Nikolyukin (eds), Shakespeare in the Soviet Union: A Collection of Articles. Translated into English by Avril Pyman (Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1966)

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Sanchez, Nicolas, L’Étoffe don’t sont faits les sous-titres. 3 vols (PhD thesis, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, 2009)

This is the first full-length study to be devoted to the translation of Shakespeare for film (and television). In the first volume the author uses a wide range of Shakespearean and other examples to explore the specificities of subtitling as a heavily constrained and therefore rather special, but also increasingly important form of Shakespeare translation. The second part of the thesis zooms in very closely on the French subtitles made by Jacqueline Cohen for three Shakespearean films: Much Ado About Nothing and Hamlet (both Kenneth Branagh), and Titus (Julie Taymor). The author concludes that a good subtitled version amounts to a perfectly valid form of translation, indeed to a truly artistic and creative achievement, and therefore worthy of greater visibility and respect. [DD]

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Sanderson, John D., Traducir el teatro de Shakespeare: Figuras retóricas iterativas en Ricardo III (Valencia: Universitat de València, 2002)

The book’s first part covers theoretical issues including the specificity of translating for the theatre and the importance of classical rhetoric for Shakespeare. The descriptive part then concentrates on the rendering of iterative rhetorical figures such as alliteration, anaphora, epanalepsis and so on, in eight Spanish translations of Richard III, the most recent of which being the author’s own version from 1998. [DD]

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Sanz Albiñana, Bartolomé,  La expresión de la sexualidad en las traducciones españolas de Hamlet (Alicante: Publicaciones de la Universidad de Alicante, 2013). ISBN 978-84-9717-263-9. Sexual language is ubiquitous in the work of Shakespeare. This monograph assesses the erotic word games, analyzing the degree of reliability in several Spanish translations of Hamlet both in Castilian and  in Catalan. To establish its validity, this study starts by examining the English editions and the Shakespearean lexicography. Then  it aims to identify the strategies used by the translators in their attempt to translate  the double underlying sense of the sexual puns — the general and the specialized —  in order to recreate the ambiguity and the various meanings of the original text, and finally offers a model that assesses the translations. [BSA]

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Sasayama, Takahasi, J. R. Mulryne and Margaret Shewring (eds), Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998)

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Sauer, Thomas G., A.W. Schlegel’s Shakespearean Criticism in England, 1811-1846. Studien zur Literatur der Monderne 9 (Bonn: Bouvier Verlag Herbert Grundman)

This monograph gives a survey of A.W. Schlegel’s writings on Shakespeare and discusses his Vorlesungen über dramatische Kunst und Litteratur as a contribution to Shakespearean criticism, before turning to the large impact Schlegel’s ideas had on British Shakespearean critics such as S.T. Coleridge, William Hazlitt and others (the cut-off date is 1846). [DD]

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Schabert, Ina, “Shakespeares Geschichtsvision in romantischen Brechungen: Die Rezeption der Historien in England, 1800-1825” in Das Shakespeare-Bild in Europa zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik. Edited by Roger Bauer, 60-76 (Bern: Peter Lang, 1988)

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Schabert, Ina (ed.) Shakespeare-Handbuch: Die Zeit, der Mensch, das Werk, die Nachwelt, 4th edn. (Stuttgart: Kröner, 2000)

While representing an older stage of scholarship, this German reference work remains an authoritative survey of Shakespeare Studies written from a European viewpoint. The fourth part of the book discusses Shakespeare’s reception in Britain, the United States and Europe. In addition to tracing the international Shakespearean traditions in criticism, the theatre, painting, film and music, this Handbuch also covers the major translations in Germany and (to a lesser extent) beyond. [DD]

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Schlebrügge, Johannes von, “Adam Müllers Shakespeare: Ein Verbündeter im romantischen Kampf gegen Napoleon” in Das Shakespeare-Bild in Europa zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik. Edited by Roger Bauer, 226-240 (Bern: Peter Lang, 1988)

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Schmidt, Alexander, Voltaires Verdienste um die Einführung Shakespeares in Frankreich (Königsberg, 1864)

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Schneider, Lina, “Shakespeare in den Niederlanden” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 26 (1891): 26-42

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Schoneveld, Cees W., “The First Dutch Translation of (a Selection of) Shakespeare’s Works (1778-1782)” in Dutch Crossing 28 (1986): 38-52

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Schoneveld, Cees W., “Transmitting the Bard to the Dutch: Dr L. A. J. Burgersdijk’s Principles of Translation and His Role in the Reception of Shakespeare in the Netherlands to 1900” in Something Understood: Studies in Anglo-Dutch Literary Translation. Edited by Bart Westerweel and Theo D’haen, 249-269 (Amsterdam and Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 1990)

This essay offers a carefully contextualised assessment of L.A.J. Burgersdijk’s Dutch Shakespeare translations (1884-1888), which was the first complete Dutch Shakespeare edition, including the non-dramatic poems. Whereas Robert-Henri Leek (see above) and other critics have tended to emphasize the formal and archaic flavour of these translations, this essay defends Burgersdijk by suggesting that his translations have unsuspected affinities with the movement of the ‘Tachtigers’ (young poets of the 1880s) and played a role in the literary innovations of the Dutch fin de siècle. [DD]

Schrickx, Willem, Foreign Envoys and Travelling Players in the Age of Shakespeare and Jonson (Wetteren, Belgium: Universa, 1986)

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Schröder, Rudolf Alexander, “Shakespeare als Dichter des Abendlandes” in Theater-Almanach 2 (1947): 220-233

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Schueller, Herbert M. (ed.), The Persistence of Shakespeare Idolatry. Essays in honor of Robert W. Babcock (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1964)

The five long essays in this volume deal with Shakespeare and modern French criticism; Dryden and the beginning of Shakespeare criticism in the Augustan Age; Shakespeare and the English Romantic movement; Shakespeare in German criticism; and the interpretation of Hamlet the character. [DD]

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Schulze, Brigitte, “Shakespeare’s Way into the West Slavic Literatures and Cultures” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 55-74 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

The author looks at translations in the West Slavic cultural areas in the period from the 1780s to the 1830s. These areas show great differences, but also some common traits and analogies in their early responses to Shakespeare. The discussion successively centres on Bohemia and Moravia, on Poland, and finally on the somewhat special case of Slovakia. On the whole, German translations and German-language cultural influences more broadly had a big impact on the reception of Shakespeare, and the latter was certainly instrumental in the breakthrough of romanticism. [DD]

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Schulze, Brigitte, “The Time Is out of Joint: The Reception of Shakespeare’s Hamlet in Polish Plays” in New Comparison 8 (1989): 99-113

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Schütt, Maria, “Hat Calderòn Shakespeare gekannt? Die Quellen von Calderòns La Cisma de Inglaterra” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 61 (1925): 94-107

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Scolnicov, Hanna and Peter Holland (eds), The Play out of Context: Transferring Plays from Culture to Culture (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989)

This volume of essays, based mostly on papers presented at the Jerusalem Theater Conference in 1986, examines the relationship between the play and its historical and cultural contexts. Transferring plays from one period or culture to another is an even more complex process than simply translating the word. Approaches vary from the theoretical to the practical, from the literary to the theatrical, with plays examined both in their own time and through history. The essays interact with each other, presenting a diversity of views of the central theme and establishing a dialogue among scholars of different cultures. With play texts quoted in English, the range of themes stretches from a Japanese interpretation of Chekhov, to Shakespeare in Nazi Germany, and to Racine borrowing from Sophocles. Even though only one of the essays deals with a Shakespearean case study, the book as a whole offers useful ideas on the problems of intercultural transfer in the theatre. [based on the editors’ abstract]

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Seaton, Ethel, Literary Relations of England and Scandinavia in the Seventeenth Century (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1935)

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Sebestyén, Ch., “Cult of Shakespeare in Hungary” in The Hungarian Quarterly (Budapest) 3 (1937): 154-163

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Semenenko, Aleksei, Hamlet the Sign. Russian Translations of Hamlet and Literary Canon Formation. Stockholm Studies in Russian Literatures 39 (Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2007)

This study examines the history of Hamlet in Russia from 1748 until the present with special attention to analysis of the canonical translations, the theatre productions of the Shakespearean classic and the phenomenon of Hamletism. The case study of the 1964 film by Grigorij Kozincev focuses on the problem of the cinematographic canon of Hamlet. Further, the work scrutinizes various types of representation of Hamlet in such semiotic systems as the theatre, the cinema, and the pictorial arts, and also examines how Hamlet functions as a specific type of sign. [based on author’s abstract]

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Serrano Ripoll, Ángeles, Bibliografía shakespeariana en España: crítica y traducción (Alicante, Instituto de Estudios Alicantinos, 1983)

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Serrano Ripoll, Ángeles, Las traducciones de Shakespeare en España: el ejemplo de Othello (Valencia: Arcos, 1988)

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Sestito, Marisa, “Julius Caesar” in Italia, 1726-1974. Biblioteca di studi inglesi 34 (Bari: Adriatica, 1978)

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Shakespeare 1564-1964. Special issue of Études anglaises 17:4 (Paris: Didier, 1964)

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Shakespeare en France. Special issue of Études anglaises 13:2 (Paris: Didier, 1960)

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“Shakespeare in Armenia” in American Review on the Soviet Union 6 (1945): 59-60

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Shakespeare in Deutschland 1864-1964 (Bochum: Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft West, 1964)

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Shakespeare in France. Special issue of Yale French Studies 33 (1964)

A heterogeneous but quite stimulating collection of texts published on the occasion of the 1964 Shakespeare celebrations. It has texts by famous Frenchmen writing on Shakespeare (Voltaire, Fr. Guizot, H. Taine) but also original scholarship about a broad range of French artistic responses to Shakespeare’s work in different periods and genres (Ducis, Delacroix, Vigny, Hugo, Berlioz, Laforgue, to name but a few). The volume is concluded by Yves Bonnefoy’s essay “Transpose or Translate?” which prefaced his 1962 Hamlet translation and by a bibliography on “Shakespeare in France”. [DD]

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Shakespeare Jahrbuch (1865-) (between 1964 and 1992 published separately in West and East Germany)

Published by the Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft, this German annual is the oldest Shakespearean periodical still in existence. Its volumes contain a wealth of information on Shakespeare’s translations and reception in (and, occasionally, beyond) Germany. [DD]

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Shakespeare Worldwide: Translation and Adaptation (formerly Shakespeare Translation) (Tokyo: Yushodo Shoten, 1974-)

This periodical, born out of the first World Shakespeare Congress (Vancouver 1971), never quite managed to establish itself as an important research forum, but, despite its erratic rhythm of publication and its inconsistent level of scholarship, it has over the years made available an abundance of material, much of it documenting the reception of Shakespeare beyond Europe. See also Multicultural Shakespeare [DD]

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Shakespeare Yearbook (Lewiston, Queenston and Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 1990-)

The series deals with all aspects of Shakespeare and his period, with particular emphasis on theatre-oriented, comparative, and interdisciplinary studies. From its fourth issue (1993) onwards each volume of this annual has a main theme. Translations and other aspects of Shakespeare’s reception abroad were given considerable attention in the volumes Shakespeare and France (vol. 5, 1995, co-edited by Jean-Marie Maguin), Shakespeare and Hungary (vol. 7, 1996, co-edited by Péter Dávidházi), Shakespeare in Japan (vol. 9, 1999, co-edited by Tetsuo Anzai, Soji Iwasaki and Peter Milward) and Shakespeare and Italy (vol. 10, 1999, co-edited by Michele Marrapodi). The volume Shakespeare and Higher Education: A Global Perspective (vol. 12, 2001, co-edited by Sharon A. Beehler) deals with problems of cross-cultural communication. A number of other volumes of the Shakespeare Yearbook investigate ‘intersemiotic’ forms of translation: The Opera and Shakespeare (vol. 4, 1994, co-edited by Christopher Smith), Hamlet on Screen (vol. 8, 1997, co-edited by Dimiter Daphinoff) and Shakespeare and the Visual Arts (vol. 11, 2000, co-edited by James L. Harner). [DD]

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Sheen, Erica, “The Pannonians and the Dalmatians: Reading for a European History in Cymbeline” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 310-320 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Shewring, Margaret, “The Politics and Aesthetics of Theatrical Languages: Richard II on the European Stage” in her King Richard II. Shakespeare in Performance, 154-179 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1996)

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Shurbanov, Alexander and Boika Sokolova, “From the Unlove of Romeo and Juliet to Hamlet without the Prince: A Shakespearean Mirror Held up to the Fortunes of New Bulgaria” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 24-53 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Shurbanov, Alexander and Boika Sokolova, Painting Shakespeare Red: An East-European Appropriation (Newark and London: University of Delaware Press, 2001)

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Siemon, James, “‘Perplex’d beyond Self-Explication’: Cymbeline and Early Modern / Postmodern Europe” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 294-309 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Silvani, Giovanna and Claudio Gallico (eds), Shakespeare e Verdi (Parma: Università di Parma, Facoltà di Lettere e Filologia, 2000)

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Simmons, Ernest J., “Catherine the Great and Shakespeare” in Publications of the Modern Language Association 47 (1932): 790-806

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Simmons, Ernest J., “The Early History of Shakespeare in Russia” in his English Literature and Culture in Russia (1553-1840), 204-236 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1935)

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Sito, Jerzy, “Shakespeare, Poland’s National Poet” in Delos 3 (1970): 147-158

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Slivnik, Francka, Shakespeare v gledaliscih srednje Evrope med obema vojnama 1918-1938 [Shakespeare in the theatres of Central Europe between the two wars, 1918-1938] (Ljubljana: Slovenski gledaliski in filmski muzej, 1994)

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Smidt, Kristian, “The Discovery of Shakespeare in Scandinavia” in European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Edited by Dirk Delabastita and Lieven D’hulst, 91-103 (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1993)

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Against the backdrop of a discussion of the geopolitical and cultural situation of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scandinavia, the author considers pre-romantic and romantic Shakespeares in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. [DD]

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Smidt, Kristian, Shakespeare i Norsk Oversettelse: En Situasjonsrapport.- (Oslo: University of Oslo, Institute for British and American Studies, 1994)

A critical assessment of all published Norwegian-language Shakespeare translations since 1923. This report was authored in Norwegian by one of the doyens of European Shakespeare Studies. [DD]

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Solt, Andor, Shakespeare in Hungarian Criticism during the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Acta Litteraria: Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 7:1-2 (Budapest: Akadémai Kiadó, 1965)

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Sorelius, Gunnar, “The Rise of Shakespeare ‘Idolatry’ in Sweden” in Literature and Its Cults: An Anthropological Approach / La littérature et ses cultes: Approche anthropologique. Edited by Péter Dávidházi and Judit Karafíath, 67-80 (Budapest: Argumentum, 1994)

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Sorelius, Gunnar and Michael Srigley (eds), Cultural Exchange between European Nations during the Renaissance. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Studia Anglistica Upsaliensia 86 (Uppsala, n.p., 1994)

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Sorge, Thomas, “Buridan’s Ass between Two Performances of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, or Bottom telos in the GDR and after” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 54-74 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Sorge, Thomas, “Tradition and Modernization: Some Thoughts on Shakespeare Criticism in the New Europe” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 321-335 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

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Sorgen, W. G. F. A., De Tooneelspeelkunst te Utrecht (The Hague, 1885)

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Spassky, Y., “Shakespeare without End” in Theatre (USSR), 4 (1939): 13-32

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Sprung, Guy, Hot Ice: Shakespeare in Moscow – A Director’s Diary (Winnipeg: Blizzard Publishing, 1991)

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Stadler, Ernst, Wielands Shakespeare (Straßburg: Karl J. Trübner, 1910)

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Stahl, Ernst L., Shakespeare und das deutsche Theater (Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 1947)

*

Stahl, Ernst L., “Shakespeare heute in Europa” in Die Quelle 2:4 (1948): 11-18

*

Stapfer, Paul, Molière et Shakespeare (Paris: Hachette, 1887)

*

Steck, Paul, Schiller und Shakespeare (Frankfurt/Main: Peter Lang, 1977)

*

Stellmacher, Wolfgang (ed.), Auseinandersetzung mit Shakespeare: Texte zur deutschen Shakespeare-Aufnahme von 1740 bis zur Französischen Revolution (Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1976)

A carefully edited collection of German essays and fragments on Shakespeare from 1740 until the late 1780s. It includes the usual suspects (from von Borck, Gottsched to Wieland, Goethe, Herder and Schiller) but also a few lesser known pieces. The introduction and to some extent the choice of texts shows the editor’s (and no doubt his publisher’s) Marxist premises. [DD]

*

Stellmacher, Wolfgang (ed.), Auseinandersetzung mit Shakespeare: Texte zur deutschen Shakespeare-Aufnahme 1790-1830 (Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1985)

The sequel to Stellmacher’s earlier anthology from 1976. It covers the romantic period and with its 378 pages it is even more generous than the earlier volume. [DD]

*

St?íbrný, Zden?k, Shakespeare and Eastern Europe (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2000)

This compact volume manages to give a comprehensive account of Shakespeare’s way into the whole of Eastern and East Central Europe, starting with the visits by the English strolling players during Shakespeare’s lifetime up to the post-communist present. Translators and translations are discussed along with other aspects of reception, including film (Grigori Kozintsev), music (Sergei Prokofiev), theatre (Bertolt Brecht) and criticism (Jan Kott). [DD]

*

Swart, Jacobus, “Shakespeare in vertaling” in A. G. H. Bachrach, J. Swart and F. W. S. van Tienen, Rondom Shakespeare, 75-103 (Zeist: Uitgeversmaatschappij W. de Haan, 1964)

*

Swart, Jacobus, “Shakespeare in Dutch Translation” in Delta 7:2 (1964): 31-40

*

Symington, Rodney, Brecht und Shakespeare (Bonn: Bouvier, 1970)

*

Symington, Rodney, The Nazi Appropriation of Shakespeare: Cultural Politics in the Third Reich (Lewiston, NY, etc.: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2006)

This monograph brings together the results of comprehensive research into Nazi cultural policy and its effect on the works of Shakespeare in the period 1933-1945. The first two chapters – with, among other things, notes on Shakespeare in WW1 and in the Weimar Republic – provide the broader historical context for the discussion of this painful episode in the history of Germany’s reception of Shakespeare. The author explains how the Nazis took over the Shakespearean heritage (presenting Shakespeare as a Germanic, Nordic figure celebrating ideals of heroism, leadership and community) and made it work for them through their translation policy, through performances on Germany’s stages, and, no less disturbingly, through the scholarship done at the universities. [DD]

*

Szaffkó, Péter, “In Search of the ‘Real’ Shakespeare: Sándor Hevesi’s Role in the Development of Hungarian Theatre Arts” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 111-129 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)

*

Szenczi, Miklós, Shakespeare in Recent Soviet criticism (Debrecen, n.p., 1965)

*

Szilassy, Zoltán, “Some New Trends and Practices in Hungarian Shakespeare Studies” in Shakespeare and Hungary. Special Theme Section: The Law and Shakespeare. Edited by Holger Klein, Péter Dávidházi and B. J. Sokol. Shakespeare Yearbook 7, 235-48 (Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)


T

Taylor, Gary, Reinventing Shakespeare: A Cultural History from the Restoration to the Present (London: The Hogarth Press, 1990)

*

Thienen, F. W. S., “Shakespeare op het toneel” in A. G. H. Bachrach, J. Swart and F. W. S. van Tienen, Rondom Shakespeare, 104-176 (Zeist: Uitgeversmaatschappij W. de Haan, 1964)

*

Thimm, F., Shakespeariana from 1564 to 1864. 2nd edn (London, 1872)

*

Thomas, Henry, Shakespeare and Spain. The Taylorian Lecture (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1922. Rpt. Folcroft, PA: Folcroft Library Editions, 1974)

*

Thomas, Sir Henry, “Shakespeare in Spain” in Proceedings of the British Academy 35 (1949): 3-24

*

Thornton Burnett, Mark and Ramona Wray (eds), Shakespeare and Ireland: History, Politics, Culture (Houndmills: Macmillan, 1997)

*

Tieghem, Paul van, Le Préromantisme: Études d’histoire littéraire européenne (La Découverte de Shakespeare sur le Continent) (Paris: Sfelt, 1947)

*

Tittmann, J., Die Schauspiele der englischen Komödianten in Deutschland (Leipzig, 1880)

*

Toury, Gideon, Descriptive Translation Studies and Beyond (Amsterdam and Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1995)

This book is the most powerful and systematic statement of the ideas of Gideon Toury, one of the pioneers and leading thinkers in Translation Studies. Among other things, Toury makes a case for descriptive, empirically-oriented translation research, he stresses the importance of duly contextualising translations within the receiving culture, and he posits the fundamental importance of norms in translation. His theoretical argument is systematically backed up by case studies, some of them dealing with Hebrew translations of Shakespearean texts: the Sonnets, the tragedies and Hamlet’s ‘To be or not be’ soliloquy. [DD]

*

Treilhou-Balaudé, Catherine, Shakespeare romantique. La réception de Shakespeare en France de Guizot à Scribe (1821-1851) (PhD thesis, Paris III-Sorbonne nouvelle, 1994)

*

Turnbull, H. G. Dalway, Shakespeare and Ibsen (Oxford: Blackwell, 1926. Rpt. New York: Haskell House, 1971)

U

Ulrici, Hermann, “Goethe und Schiller in ihrem Verhältnis zu Shakespeare” in his Abhandlungen zur Kunstgeschichte als angewandter Ästhetik (Leipzig, 1876)

*

Ulrici, Hermann, Über Shakespeares dramatische Kunst und sein Verhältnis zu Calderon und Goethe (Halle, 1839)

*

Unflad, Ludwig, Die Shakespeare-Literatur in Deutschland (Munich, 1880)


V

Van Bragt, Katrin, Bibliographie des traductions françaises (1810-1840). Répertoire par disciplines (Leuven: Universitaire Pers Leuven, 1995).

A massive bibliography accompanied by a CD-ROM listing all translations into French and published in France in the period 1810-1840. Many Shakespearean versions are included; the time span covered coincides with the period of the romantic debates in France. [DD]

*

Verdaguer, Isabel, “Shakespeare Translations in Spain” in Ilha do desterro: A Journal of English Language, Literatures in English, and Cultural Studies (Brazil), 36 (1999): 87-110

*

Vetter, Theodor, “Shakespeare und die deutsche Schweiz” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 48 (1912): 21-36

*

Vielhaber, Christiane, Shakespeare auf dem Theater Westdeutschlands, 1945-1975 (PhD thesis, University of Cologne, 1977)

*

Villemain, A. F., Essai biographique et littéraire sur Shakespeare (Paris, 1838)

*

Vo?adlo, Otakar, “Shakespeare and Bohemia” in Shakespeare Survey 9 (1956): 101-110

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Voigt, Felix A. and Walter A. Reichert, Hauptmann and Shakespeare: Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Fortlebens Shakespeares in Deutschland (Breslau: Maruschke & Berendt, 1938. Rev. edn. Goslar: Deutsche Volksbücherei, 1947)

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Vuraldi, Mert, Shakespeare in der Türkei (Frankfurt/Main, etc.: Peter Lang, 1979)


W

Wagner, Wilhelm, “Shakespeare in Griechenland” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 12 (1877): 33-56

*

Weber Henking, Irene (ed.), Translating/traduire/tradurre Shakespeare (Lausanne: Centre de Traduction Littéraire de Lausanne, 2001)

This fortieth issue of the Travaux du Centre de traduction littéraire contains four substantial papers on Shakespeare in translation. One essay focuses on the Italian translator Eugenio Montale. The renowned French translator Jean-Michel Déprats contributes a wide-ranging essay on various problématiques de la traduction shakespearienne. Two further essays deal with Italian, French and German renderings of the Sonnets. [DD]

*

Weimann, Robert, “A Divided Heritage: Conflicting Appropriations of Shakespeare in (East) Germany” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 173-205 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

*

Weiss, Wolfgang, Shakespeare in Bayern – und auf Bairisch (Passau: Verlag KarlStutz, 2008)

The first three chapters of this first monograph on dialect translation of Shakespeare deal with the German adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays and their performances by English travelling companies in Bavarian towns and cities from Shakespeare’s lifetime to the end of the Thirty Years’ War. Chapter 4 contains a short history of translating Shakespeare into German with special regard to the stylistic registers and chapter 5 an incomplete list of the Bard’s plays and sonnets translated into German regional languages and dialects. In the last three chapters Bavarian versions of plays, monologues, and sonnets are discussed, among them Shakespearean influences in the plays of the so-called Bauern-Shakespeare (peasants’ Shakespeare) Joseph Georg Schmalz (1773 ? – 1845), the anonymous Seebrucker Hamlet (1854), and modern Bavarian versions of the 20th and 21st centuries, e. g. a most successful Macbeth in the dialect of the Bavarian Forest (2003). [WW]

*

Wells, Robin Headlam, “‘The Question of these Wars’: Hamlet in the New Europe” in Shakespeare in the New Europe. Edited by Michael Hattaway, Boika Sokolova and Derek Roper, 92-109 (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1994)

*

Wells, Stanley and Sarah Stanton (eds), The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Stage (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002)

This book explores the enormous variety of Shakespearean performances in Britain and on the international stage. After a detailed survey of the British stage history of Shakespeare, followed by a number of essays on specific issues (tragic roles, comic roles, women in Shakespearean performances), the book turns its attention to international developments, with essays on touring, politically inspired performances in Europe and elsewhere, and theatrical Shakespeare versions in North America, Asia and Africa. [DD]

*

WillemsMichèleLa genèse du mythe shakespearien, 1660-1780 (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1979)

The book studies the emergence of bardolatry in England as the construction of combined images: that of the creative genius, paradoxically fostered by the neo-classical critical reception of the dramatist, and that of a Shakespearean universe assimilated to divine creation, nurtured in the public's consciousness by the stage versions performed by great actors from Betterton to Garrick. [MW]

*

Willems, Michèle, “Hamlet in France” (http:// www.hamletworks.org) (2004-)

This some 20.000 word essay is appended to the site which records the progress of the new Hamlet Variorum. It surveys the reception of the play in France from Voltaire's 1733 “Lettres philosophiques” to Peter Brook's 2000 production, analyzing criticism and performance, as well as translation and cultural impact. [See the same section, for essays covering the reception of the play in Germany (by Roger Paulin), Flanders, Poland, Italy and Spain]. [MW]

*

Willems, Michèle, “The Mouse and the Urn : Re-visions of Shakespeare from Voltaire to Ducis” in Shakespeare Survey 60 (2007): 214-222 [Rpt. in Shakespeare im 18. Jahrhundert. Edited by Roger Paulin, 231-242 (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2007)]

As an illustration of the incompatibility between the Neo-classicists’ demand for a strict separation of styles, and Shakespeare's mixture of genres and languages, Hamlet' s "Not a mouse stirring" is here envisaged as a straightforward case of linguistic revision from which to explore Jean-François Ducis's drastic re-vision of the play, and particularly his "translation" of Old Hamlet's ghost into an urn. [MW]


*


Willems, Michèle, “L’excès face au bon goût : la réception de Gilles-Shakespeare de Voltaire à Hugo” in Shakespeare et l’excès (http://www.societefrancaiseshakespeare.org) (2007)

While Voltaire often disparages Shakespeare as a “Gilles”, a traditional clown in popular theatre, Victor Hugo proclaims, a century later, that he admires both Gilles and Shakespeare, elsewhere defined as the grotesque and the sublime. This article analyses this evolution in the aesthetics of drama as the result of the clash between a classical model ruled by the demands of taste, and a Shakespearean model in which excess seems to be the norm. Though censured by critics and emended by adapters on both sides of the Channel, excess then fascinates as much as it irritates. But while, in eighteenth-century England, literary concepts evolve under the influence of Shakespeare’s drama, in France, it is only with Victor Hugo that the organic function of excess is recognized and that Gilles-Shakespeare is made legitimate. [MW]

*

Willems, Michèle, “Cachez cette souris...: la langue de Shakespeare dominée par les Classiques en France et en Angleterre.” Langues dominantes, Langues dominées. Edited by Laurence Villard, 181-194 (Rouen: Presses universitaires, 2008)

Although references to Shakespeare’s language now often conjure up ideas of cultural hegemony, until the end of the eighteenth century his text was subjected to the neo-classical rule, as is revealed by the transformations of Macbeth in England or of Hamlet in France. Reformulation went far beyond the necessities of translation. From Davenant to Ducis, from Dr Johnson to Voltaire, the domestication of Shakespeare’s language through rewriting and censure aimed at reducing the gap between two modes of representation, between two different conceptions of Mimesis. [MW]

 
*

WillemsMichèle, “Voltaire Revisited” in Great Shakespeareans, Voltaire, Goethe, Schlegel, Coleridge (Volume III)”. Edited by Roger Paulin, 5-43 (Continuum International Publishing Group, 2010).

As part of an eighteen-volume survey of major Shakespearean critics, editors, actors and directors, this chapter revisits Voltaire’s contribution to the reception of Shakespeare in France and in Europe, in the light of the paradoxes and contradictions which are the trademark of his age and of his life, assessing its influence and afterlife in the wider cultural context of the eighteenth century and in comparison with other major figures. [MW]

*

William Shakespeare. Special issue of Armada. Tijdschrift voor Wereldliteratuur 33 (2003)

*

“William Shakespeare und G. B. Shaw in Polen” in Kulturprobleme des Neuen Polen (Berlin), 4 (1952): 3-6

*

Williams, Simon, Shakespeare on the German Stage. Vol. 1: 1586-1914 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989)

An authoritative illustrated history of the performance and reception of Shakespeare’s plays on the German stage from the English strolling players in the late sixteenth century until the outbreak of World War I. Stage history being the author’s main concern, most attention is given to translations and adaptations that made an impact in the theatre. See also Hortmann (above). [DD]

*

Wilson, Charles, Holland and Britain (London: William Collins Sons & Co., 1946)

*

Wilson, Richard, “NATO’s Pharmacy: Shakespeare by Prescription” in Shakespeare and National Culture. Edited by John J. Joughin, 58-80 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997)

*

World Shakespeare Bibliography

Besides a wealth of other items, this standard reference tool lists translations of Shakespeare worldwide, as well as scholarly studies on the translation and reception of Shakespeare. Published annually in Shakespeare Quarterly (1950-), but it can now also be consulted in an expanded electronic edition: World Shakespeare Bibliography Online. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press for the Folger Shakespeare Library, 2001-. [DD]

*

Worp, J. A., Engelsche Tooneelspelers op het vasteland in de 16de en 17de eeuw (Nederlandsch Museum, 1886)

Written in Dutch by one of Holland’s pioneers in theatre history, this study considers the fortunes of the English “strolling players” on the European continent. [DD]

*

Würtenberg, Gustav (ed.), Shakespeare in Deutschland (Bielefeld: Verlag von Velhagen & Klasing, 1942)

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Wurzbach, Wolfgang von, “Shakespeares Heinrich VIII und Calderóns La Cisma de Inglaterra” in Shakespeare Jahrbuch 32 (1896), 190-211


X

Y

Yalman, Tunç, Shakespeare in Atatürk’s Turkey (New York: Office of the Ambassador for Cultural Affairs, Republic of Turkey, 1981)

*

Yanni, Mara, “Shakespeare and the Greeks: Α Ηundred Years of Negotiations" in Shakespeare Yearbook 14. Edited by Douglas Brooks, 193-214 (Lewiston: The Edwin Mellen Press, 2004)

Four different theatrical spaces in four different historical moments serve as points of reference for examining closely Shakespeare’s appropriation in the Greek theater from 1840 to 1940. The different Shakespeares emerging in each case, suggest divergent socio-cultural contexts and viewpoints: The popularizing practices of the first professional Greek travelling companies in the last part of the 19th century; the hegemonic associations of the Greek Royal Theater at the dawn of the 20th century; the commercialism of the star-system in the next decades; and the vision of a theatre of high art for the educated bourgeoisie in the Greek National Theater of the 1930ies. [MY]

*

Yanni, Mara, Shakespeare’s Travels: Greek Representations of Hamlet in the 19th Century. Pre-publication in Parousia, University of Athens Monographs 66 (Athens: University of Athens Press, 2005). 301 pp.
 
The book focuses on the  Shakespearean performances of the 19th century Greek travelling actors, in their itinerary from Athens to Constantinople, Smyrna, Egypt, the Danube principalities etc. Hamlet is used as an exemplum, but the research also produces a record of all the other Shakespearean plays produced in this context. The main argument is that the civic belatedness and popularizing aesthetics of the nascent professional Greek theatre actually challenge and negate the status of Shakespeare as a cultural icon. The dissolution of the hegemonic associations that these practices entail, makes the social field of the 19th century professional Greek theatre the only place in which a “living” transformation of Shakespeare’s dramas became possible. [MY]

*

Yanni, Mara, “The Translation of King Lear by K. Theotokis” in William Shakespeare, King Lear: Translated by Konstantinos Theotokis (1910). Edited by M. Yanni, 9-33 (Athens: Ideogramma, 2005)

The article is an Introduction to the first printed edition of the 1910 translation of King Lear by Konstantinos Theotokis. It is argued that the importance of the translation lies in the political implications of the translator’s use of the local linguistic idiom of his place of origins (Ionian Islands), which brings to the surface elements of Greek popular culture as well as issues of class structure and hierarchy. [MY]

*

Yanni, Mara, “Shakespeare and the Audiences of the Greek Travelling Actors” in Gramma 15 (Thessalonike, 2007): 175-192

The study of the social and performative fields of the first Greek Shakespearian performances in the 19th century reveal the complex process that led to the formation of the first Greek audiences -- the aspiring bourgeoisie of the newly formed Greek state. In contrast to the exclusionist European vision of the theatre sustained by the ruling elite of Athens, the practices of low class travelling actors and inexperienced Greek audiences, generated a comprehensive utopian social vision that, cutting across all kinds of exclusionary distinctions, represented the desires of the ethnos rather than individual interests of classes or groups. [MY]

*

Yoland, A., “The Cult of Shakespeare in Hungary” in The Hungarian Quarterly (Budapest), 5 (1938): 285-296


Z

Zacharias, Gerhard P., “Macbeth in uns” in Das neue Forum (Darmstadt), 5 (1955/1956): 113-114

*

Zanco, Aurelio, Shakespeare in Russia (Bologna: N. Zanichelli, 1938)

*

Zanco, Aurelio, Shakespeare in Russia e altri saggi (Turin: Editore Gheroni, 1945)

*

Zaro, Juan J., “Moratín’s translation of Hamlet (1798): a study of the paratexts” in The Practices of Literary Translation. Constraints and Creativity. Edited by Jean Boase-Beier and Michael Holman, 125-134 (Manchester: St Jerome, 1999)

Leandro Fernández de Moratín’s translation of Hamlet into Spanish, which was completed in the period between 1792 and 1794, and was published in Madrid in 1798 under the pseudonym of ‘Inarco Celenio’, is considered to be the first faithful Spanish translation of a Shakespeare play. This paper aims to study the texts accompanying the translation. The main focus is on the paratexts not because they justify or explain the decisions taken by the translator (this being their usual function), but rather because this is an unusual case, in that they reflect the tensions between the decisions made by Moratín as a translator and his theoretical beliefs about the concept of drama. The purpose of the notes was ‘didactic’: they were meant to ‘illustrate’ and ‘explain’, but in fact they were used to make comments about a given text. [based on author’s abstract]

*

Zaro, Juan J., Shakespeare y sus traductores: análisis crítico de siete traducciones españolas de obras de Shakespeare. Spanish Perspectives on English and American Literature, Communication and Culture 1 (Bern, etc.: Peter Lang, 2007)

The author discusses seven Spanish Shakespeare translations covering a wide time span from Leandro Fernández de Moratín’s Hamlet (1798) until El mercader de Venecia (The Merchant of Venice) by Vicente Molina Foix (1995). [DD]

*

Zaryan, Rouben V., Shakespeare and the Armenians. Translated by Haig Voskerchian (Yerevan: Academy of Sciences Press, 1969)